Sketch and Speak: An Expository Intervention Using Note-Taking and Oral Practice for Children With Language-Related Learning Disabilities Purpose This preliminary study investigated an intervention procedure employing 2 types of note-taking and oral practice to improve expository reporting skills. Procedure Forty-four 4th to 6th graders with language-related learning disabilities from 9 schools were assigned to treatment or control conditions that were balanced for grade, oral language, ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   November 15, 2018
Sketch and Speak: An Expository Intervention Using Note-Taking and Oral Practice for Children With Language-Related Learning Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Teresa A. Ukrainetz
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Teresa A. Ukrainetz: teresa.ukrainetz@usu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Kerry Ebert
    Editor: Kerry Ebert×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   November 15, 2018
Sketch and Speak: An Expository Intervention Using Note-Taking and Oral Practice for Children With Language-Related Learning Disabilities
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-18-0047
History: Received March 15, 2018 , Revised May 23, 2018 , Accepted June 29, 2018
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-18-0047
History: Received March 15, 2018; Revised May 23, 2018; Accepted June 29, 2018

Purpose This preliminary study investigated an intervention procedure employing 2 types of note-taking and oral practice to improve expository reporting skills.

Procedure Forty-four 4th to 6th graders with language-related learning disabilities from 9 schools were assigned to treatment or control conditions that were balanced for grade, oral language, and other features. The treatment condition received 6 30-min individual or pair sessions from the school of speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Treatment involved reducing statements from grade-level science articles into concise ideas, recording the ideas as pictographic and conventional notes, and expanding from the notes into full oral sentences that are then combined into oral reports. Participants were pretested and posttested on taking notes from grade-level history articles and using the notes to give oral reports. Posttesting also included written reports 1 to 3 days following the oral reports.

Results The treatment group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group on multiple quality features of the notes and oral reports. Quantity, holistic oral quality, and delayed written reports were not significantly better. The SLPs reported high levels of student engagement and learning of skills and content within treatment. They attributed the perceived benefits to the elements of simplicity, visuals, oral practice, repeated opportunities, and visible progress.

Conclusion This study indicates potential for Sketch and Speak to improve student performance in expository reporting and gives direction for strengthening and further investigating this novel SLP treatment.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.7268651

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a Utah State University new faculty research startup grant. The author would like to thank Catherine L. Ross for her clinical insights in the development of this treatment and early assistance in this project. The author thanks Laramie County School District SLPs and their students for giving of their valuable time and energy, especially Amy K. Peterson, whose participation inspired her to pursue a doctor of philosophy. Appreciation goes to the dedicated research assistants: University of Wyoming's Haley Hight and Riley Dolezal and Utah State University's Kristin Pritchard, Tristin Hampshire, Nicole Pearson, and Megan Keate, with particular thanks to R. J. Risueño, who far exceeded expectations for an undergraduate assistant.
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