Screening Children's Speech: The Impact of Imitated Elicitation and Word Position Purpose Diagnostic decision making is influenced by the attributes of assessments. In order to propose time-efficient protocols for screening children's speech, this study aimed to determine whether eliciting imitated responses and analyzing productions in different word positions resulted in different levels of consonant accuracy. Method Participants were 267 ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   October 30, 2018
Screening Children's Speech: The Impact of Imitated Elicitation and Word Position
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sharynne McLeod
    School of Teacher Education, Charles Sturt University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Sarah Masso
    School of Teacher Education, Charles Sturt University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Disclosure: Sharynne McLeod is the author of the International Speech Screener. Sarah Masso has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: Sharynne McLeod is the author of the International Speech Screener. Sarah Masso has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Sharynne McLeod: smcleod@csu.edu.au
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Ignatius Nip
    Editor: Ignatius Nip×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   October 30, 2018
Screening Children's Speech: The Impact of Imitated Elicitation and Word Position
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0141
History: Received December 5, 2017 , Revised April 6, 2018 , Accepted June 29, 2018
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0141
History: Received December 5, 2017; Revised April 6, 2018; Accepted June 29, 2018

Purpose Diagnostic decision making is influenced by the attributes of assessments. In order to propose time-efficient protocols for screening children's speech, this study aimed to determine whether eliciting imitated responses and analyzing productions in different word positions resulted in different levels of consonant accuracy.

Method Participants were 267 English-speaking preschool-age children in the Sound Start Study whose parents were concerned about their speech. They were assessed using the International Speech Screener: Research Version (ISS; McLeod, 2013) using either imitated or spontaneous elicitation. Productions were compared with an established diagnostic assessment of speech accuracy (Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology; Dodd, Hua, Crosbie, Holm, & Ozanne, 2002).

Results Participants' performance on the ISS was significantly correlated with performance on the Diagnostic Evaluation of Articulation and Phonology. Eliciting imitated productions on the ISS (M = 2:18 min, SD = 0:59 min) took significantly less time than spontaneous productions (M = 6:32 min, SD = 2:34 min). There was no significant difference in accuracy of imitated versus spontaneous productions in word-initial position; however, consonants were significantly less accurate in spontaneous than imitated productions in other word positions. Overall, participants had significantly lower consonant accuracy in word-initial position than within-word or word-final positions. Examination of the influence of word position on test discrimination, using receiver operating characteristic analyses, revealed acceptable test discrimination for percentage of consonants correct across word positions.

Conclusion This research supports using imitated elicitation and analysis of percentage of consonants correct in word-initial position as a time-efficient procedure when screening the speech of English-speaking preschool children.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the following sources: Australian Research Council Discovery Grant DP130102545 (awarded to Sharynne McLeod, Elise Baker, Jane McCormack, Yvonne Wren, and Sue Roulstone) and the Charles Sturt University Faculty of Arts and Education Research Assistant Scheme. The authors thank Kate Crowe for data collection support and Charlotte Howland, Felicity McKellar, Grear McAdam, and Ninh Dang Vu for data entry.
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