Clinical Forum: Dyslexia What do speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need to know about dyslexia? How can SLPs positively impact children with dyslexia? The 13 articles in LSHSS's Clinical Forum: Dyslexia answer these questions by providing up-to-date, evidence-based information about dyslexia that can be readily applied to clinical practice. This forum is unique in that ... Announcement
Newly Published Free
Announcement  |   October 25, 2018
Clinical Forum: Dyslexia
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Announcement   |   October 25, 2018
Clinical Forum: Dyslexia
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
What do speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need to know about dyslexia? How can SLPs positively impact children with dyslexia? The 13 articles in LSHSS's Clinical Forum: Dyslexia answer these questions by providing up-to-date, evidence-based information about dyslexia that can be readily applied to clinical practice. This forum is unique in that it is the only set of articles to focus on dyslexia with the SLP in mind.
Forum editor Tiffany P. Hogan provides an introduction with knowledge about dyslexia as relating to SLPs, including a breakdown of the "simple view of reading."
Suzanne M. Adlof and Tiffany P. Hogan focus on dyslexia in relation to developmental language disorder, while Kathryn L. Cabbage, Kelly Farquharson, Jenya Iuzzini-Seigel, Jennifer Zuk, and Tiffany P. Hogan consider its relation to speech sound disorders. Meredith Saletta expands these topics to adolescence and adulthood.
Anila M. D'Mello and John D. E. Gabrieli establish the neurological basis of dyslexia by noting key differences between those with dyslexia versus typically developing peers.
Jeannene M. Ward-Lonergan and Jill K. Duthie focus on the legislative changes regarding dyslexia in the United States. This sets the stage for Danielle Colenbrander, Jessie Ricketts, and Helen L. Breadmore to describe the benefits and challenges associated with the early identification of dyslexia. Douglas B. Petersen, Shelbi L. Gragg, and Trina D. Spencer provide original research surrounding dynamic assessment of decoding administered in kindergarten. Brianna L. Yamasaki and Gigi Luk report Massachusetts statewide special education data that show students with diverse language backgrounds and those with low income were disproportionately representing in special education.
Stephanie Al Otaiba, Amy Gillespie Rouse, and Kristi Baker provide a narrative review of the literature regarding intensive interventions for elementary grade students with dyslexia, students with learning disabilities, and students with intensive reading and writing needs. Michael Hebert, Devin M. Kearns, Joanne Baker Hayes, Pamela Bazis, and Samantha Cooper focus on writing, describing intervention strategies in spelling, transcription, executive function, and working memory. Finally, Gabrielle Rappolt-Schlichtmann, Alyssa R. Boucher, and Miriam Evans argue for a shift in focus from a deficit model of intervention for children with dyslexia to a strength-based approach.
To conclude, Tiffany P. Hogan summarizes five steps SLPs can do to positively impact children with dyslexia.