Language Sample Practices With Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing Purpose In this study, we aimed to identify common language sample practices of professionals who work with children who are Deaf/hard of hearing (DHH) who use listening and spoken language as a means to better understand why and how language sampling can be utilized by speech-language pathologists serving this population. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 24, 2018
Language Sample Practices With Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristina M. Blaiser
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Idaho State University, Meridian
  • Megan A. Shannahan
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Idaho State University, Meridian
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kristina Blaiser: kristina.blaiser@isu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Patricia Brooks
    Editor: Patricia Brooks×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 24, 2018
Language Sample Practices With Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2018, Vol. 49, 950-964. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0130
History: Received November 20, 2017 , Revised February 15, 2018 , Accepted May 11, 2018
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2018, Vol. 49, 950-964. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0130
History: Received November 20, 2017; Revised February 15, 2018; Accepted May 11, 2018

Purpose In this study, we aimed to identify common language sample practices of professionals who work with children who are Deaf/hard of hearing (DHH) who use listening and spoken language as a means to better understand why and how language sampling can be utilized by speech-language pathologists serving this population.

Method An electronic questionnaire was disseminated to professionals who serve children who are DHH and use listening and spoken language in the United States. Participant responses were coded in an Excel file and checked for completeness. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze trends.

Results A total of 168 participants participated in the survey. A majority of participants reported that they use language sampling as a part of their intervention when working with children who are DHH. However, approximately half of participants reported using norm-referenced testing most often when evaluating language of children who are DHH, regardless of the fact that they felt that language samples were more sensitive in identifying the errors of children who are DHH. Participants reported using language samples to monitor progress and set goals for clients. Participants rarely used language samples for eligibility and interprofessional collaboration.

Conclusions Language samples offer a unique way to examine a child's language development that norm-referenced assessments are not sensitive enough to detect, particularly for children who are DHH. This offers insights into current practice and implications for the development of a more clearly defined language sample protocol to guide practices in the use of language samples with children who are DHH and use listening and spoken language.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on data collected in the thesis project of the second author, Megan Shannahan, completed at Idaho State University under the supervision of the first author. The authors thank Diane Ogiela, Amy Hardy, and Elizabeth Horn for their feedback on this project.
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