Clinical Forum: Working Memory in School-Age Children The July 2018 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools begins with the Clinical Forum: Working Memory in School-Age Children: Ronald B. Gillam, clinical forum editor, provides a solid background of working memory and its importance for explicit and implicit learning. Gillam describes how the articles explore the ... Announcement
Newly Published Free
Announcement  |   July 05, 2018
Clinical Forum: Working Memory in School-Age Children
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Announcement   |   July 05, 2018
Clinical Forum: Working Memory in School-Age Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
The July 2018 issue of Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools begins with the Clinical Forum: Working Memory in School-Age Children:
Ronald B. Gillam, clinical forum editor, provides a solid background of working memory and its importance for explicit and implicit learning. Gillam describes how the articles explore the current state of our understanding of working memory and its importance for understanding the language and academic skills of school-age children developing typically as well as those with language and learning difficulties.
Eryn J. Adams, Anh T. Nguyen, and Nelson Cowan begin the collection with a review article that provides information about the nature of working memory and the manner in which working memory relates to language development. The authors provide in-depth knowledge about three popular theories of working memory.
Genesis D. Arizmendi, Mary Alt, Shelley Gray, Tiffany P. Hogan, Samuel Green, and Nelson Cowan, in their research article, discuss working memory with bilingual and monolingual children. Specifically, they investigated the idea that bilingual children—having had the experience of learning two languages simultaneously—have an advantage over monolingual children on executive tasks.
H. Lee Swanson, Jennifer Kong, and Stefania Petcu also focused on bilingual children, specifically on working memory and language ability in regard to math gains. They investigated whether bilingual proficiency plays a significant role in the growth of these areas.
Katie E. Squires reports on the role that cognitive load plays in the relationship between working memory and reading in school-age children who are poor decoders. The research article concludes with implications for training instruction in reading.
Beula M. Magimairaj and Naveen K. Nagaraj, in their clinical focus article, suggest an integrative framework for conceptualizing the relationships between working memory and auditory processing. Their framework integrates evidence from cognitive science, hearing science, and language science.
Lisa M. D. Archibald explains the reciprocal relationships between working memory and language and discusses assessment procedures that may be useful for identifying working memory factors that underlie language performance. Standardized and nonstandardized tools designed to assess working memory or linguistic skills are critically evaluated.
Sandra Gillam, Sarai Holbrook, Jamie Mecham, and Daylene Weller review the current state of research on the outcomes of working memory interventions. They review meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, and nonrandomized comparison studies investigating the role of working memory interventions for improving capacity and skills.
To conclude, Bonnie D. Singer and Anthony S. Bashir argue for a comprehensive, multidimensional treatment model for the intervention of children with limited verbal working memory abilities. They pull from existing research and theory to advocate a clinical framework that considers the knowledge and abilities of the student and the language-learning demands they face in various contexts of a school day.