The Reciprocal Influences of Working Memory and Linguistic Knowledge on Language Performance: Considerations for the Assessment of Children With Developmental Language Disorder Purpose This article considers how the language performance of school-age children with language impairments, such as developmental language disorder, is influenced by the reciprocal relationship of existing linguistic knowledge and working memory resources and the resultant implications for assessment. Method A viewpoint is provided by reviewing working memory ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   July 05, 2018
The Reciprocal Influences of Working Memory and Linguistic Knowledge on Language Performance: Considerations for the Assessment of Children With Developmental Language Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa M. D. Archibald
    University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Correspondence to Lisa Archibald: larchiba@uwo.ca
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Ron Gillam
    Editor: Ron Gillam×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Clinical Forum: Working Memory in School-Age Children.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Clinical Forum: Working Memory in School-Age Children.×
Article Information
Clinical Forum: Working Memory in School-Age Children / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   July 05, 2018
The Reciprocal Influences of Working Memory and Linguistic Knowledge on Language Performance: Considerations for the Assessment of Children With Developmental Language Disorder
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2018, Vol. 49, 424-433. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0094
History: Received September 8, 2017 , Revised February 14, 2018 , Accepted March 28, 2018
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2018, Vol. 49, 424-433. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0094
History: Received September 8, 2017; Revised February 14, 2018; Accepted March 28, 2018

Purpose This article considers how the language performance of school-age children with language impairments, such as developmental language disorder, is influenced by the reciprocal relationship of existing linguistic knowledge and working memory resources and the resultant implications for assessment.

Method A viewpoint is provided by reviewing working memory theory, empirical evidence of the reciprocal relationship between working memory and existing language knowledge, and critically evaluating available standardized and nonstandardized tools designed to assess working memory or linguistic skills.

Conclusions Speech-language pathologists with an excellent understanding of the reciprocal relationship between working memory and linguistic knowledge will need to examine performance across tasks and contexts varying in these demands in order to achieve an accurate clinical profile of relevant strengths and weaknesses for individual children.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access