Young Children's Structure Production: A Revision of the Index of Productive Syntax Purpose The Index of Productive Syntax (IPSyn; Scarborough, 1990) is widely used to measure syntax production in young children. The goal of this article is to promote greater clarity and consistency in machine and hand scoring by presenting a revised version of the IPSyn (IPSyn-R) and comparing it with the ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 24, 2018
Young Children's Structure Production: A Revision of the Index of Productive Syntax
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Evelyn P. Altenberg
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
  • Jenny A. Roberts
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
  • Hollis S. Scarborough
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Evelyn P. Altenberg: sphepa@hofstra.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Patricia Brooks
    Editor: Patricia Brooks×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 24, 2018
Young Children's Structure Production: A Revision of the Index of Productive Syntax
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2018, Vol. 49, 995-1008. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0092
History: Received September 5, 2017 , Revised December 6, 2017 , Accepted March 16, 2018
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2018, Vol. 49, 995-1008. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0092
History: Received September 5, 2017; Revised December 6, 2017; Accepted March 16, 2018

Purpose The Index of Productive Syntax (IPSyn; Scarborough, 1990) is widely used to measure syntax production in young children. The goal of this article is to promote greater clarity and consistency in machine and hand scoring by presenting a revised version of the IPSyn (IPSyn-R) and comparing it with the original IPSyn (IPSyn-O).

Method Longitudinal syntax production in 10 30- and 42-month-old typically developing children drawn from the Child Language Data Exchange System (MacWhinney, 2000) Weismer corpus was examined, using both the IPSyn-O and the IPSyn-R.

Results The IPSyn-R provided nearly identical scores to the IPSyn-O with the exception of scores affected primarily by 1 modified noun phrase structure. Structures ranked as more advanced were produced less frequently. The results also reveal which of the IPSyn-R's 59 structures were most and least likely to be produced by this sample at these ages.

Conclusions The qualitative and quantitative differences between the IPSyn-O and the IPSyn-R are relatively minor. The IPSyn-R can make it easier to score the IPSyn, both by clinicians and researchers, and facilitate the IPSyn's move to machine scoring of language samples.

Acknowledgments
This research was partially supported by a Hofstra University Faculty Research and Development Grant, 2010–2011, and a Hofstra University Presidential Research Award, 2010–2011, both awarded to Evelyn P. Altenberg and Jenny A. Roberts. Our thanks to Susan Ellis Weismer for contributing her transcripts to the CHILDES database. The data were collected with the support of NIDCD R01 DC00371 (Ellis-Weismer, PI). Our thanks to Kathleen Scott for help with the statistical analysis. Thanks also to our research assistants, Kasey MacPherson, Amanda Thompson, Cara Walker, and Rebecca Ragusa, for all their efforts, and to Derresha Harding, Victoria Silver, Ashley Adam, and Jennifer O'Malley for their assistance with the data. Portions of this article were presented at the 2010 and 2011 Conventions of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and at the 2011 Boston University Child Language Development Conference.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access