Clinical Implications for Working With Nonmainstream Dialect Speakers: A Focus on Two Filipino Kindergartners Purpose The purpose of this clinical focus piece is to increase familiarity with Philippine English (PE) and highlight clinical implications for working with nonmainstream dialect speakers. Method The clinical focus draws on descriptive case study data from 2 Filipino kindergarten boys who live in the United States. Multiple ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   July 05, 2018
Clinical Implications for Working With Nonmainstream Dialect Speakers: A Focus on Two Filipino Kindergartners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Megan-Brette Hamilton
    Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, AL
  • Henry Angulo-Jiménez
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, Champaign
  • Christine Taylo
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, Champaign
  • Laura S. DeThorne
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, Champaign
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Megan-Brette Hamilton: meganbrette@auburn.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Patrick Proctor
    Editor: Patrick Proctor×
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   July 05, 2018
Clinical Implications for Working With Nonmainstream Dialect Speakers: A Focus on Two Filipino Kindergartners
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2018, Vol. 49, 497-508. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0060
History: Received June 14, 2017 , Revised September 12, 2017 , Accepted January 14, 2018
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2018, Vol. 49, 497-508. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0060
History: Received June 14, 2017; Revised September 12, 2017; Accepted January 14, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this clinical focus piece is to increase familiarity with Philippine English (PE) and highlight clinical implications for working with nonmainstream dialect speakers.

Method The clinical focus draws on descriptive case study data from 2 Filipino kindergarten boys who live in the United States. Multiple ethnographic data sources were subjected to contrastive analyses regarding nonmainstream features in the children's speech that might be consistent with PE.

Results The 2 boys demonstrated grammatical and phonological features consistent with their home dialect, PE, and individualized variation relative to one another. We utilize these findings to illustrate 2 key implications for providing culturally competent clinical services when working with nonmainstream dialect speakers: (a) validate and support all Mainstream American English Learners in the classroom and (b) recognize that variance within a dialect is not always indicative of disorder. Explicit recommendations for clinical practice are provided.

Conclusion Understanding and validating the diversity of nonmainstream dialect speakers within the U.S. schools are critical to providing culturally competent speech-language services.

Acknowledgments
The authors want to extend their sincere gratitude to Ben and Leo's families and the participating school. In addition, the authors also thank members of the Child Language and Literacy Lab at the University of Illinois for assistance with data collection and analyses, especially Paulina Mitra, Alison Dey, Bridget Dumoulin, and Carolyn Weis.
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