Treating Childhood Apraxia of Speech With the Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol: A Phase I Pilot Study Purpose A Phase I pilot study was designed to collect preliminary evidence on the use of the Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol (K-SLP; Kaufman, 2014) to treat children with childhood apraxia of speech. We hypothesized that the K-SLP approach would result in more accurate speech production in targeted words, whereas ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   April 05, 2018
Treating Childhood Apraxia of Speech With the Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol: A Phase I Pilot Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maryane Gomez
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Patricia McCabe
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Kathy Jakielski
    Augustana College, Rock Island, IL
  • Alison Purcell
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Maryane Gomez: mgom5883@uni.sydney.edu.au
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Ignatius Nip
    Editor: Ignatius Nip×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   April 05, 2018
Treating Childhood Apraxia of Speech With the Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol: A Phase I Pilot Study
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0100
History: Received September 21, 2017 , Revised November 20, 2017 , Accepted December 18, 2017
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_LSHSS-17-0100
History: Received September 21, 2017; Revised November 20, 2017; Accepted December 18, 2017

Purpose A Phase I pilot study was designed to collect preliminary evidence on the use of the Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol (K-SLP; Kaufman, 2014) to treat children with childhood apraxia of speech. We hypothesized that the K-SLP approach would result in more accurate speech production in targeted words, whereas untrained (control) words and speech sounds would remain unchanged.

Method A single-case multiple-baseline across behaviors experimental design was used to see if experimental feasibility could be demonstrated. Two children each received a total of 12 1-hr treatment sessions over 3 weeks. The children's response to treatment and experimental control was measured by administering baseline, treatment, and posttreatment probes.

Results Both children showed some response to treatment, as measured by percent phonemes correct; however, the response to treatment varied. In general, for the treated words that improved with therapy, accuracy was maintained above baseline level during the maintenance phase. Minimal generalization was observed for this study, with only 1 participant generalizing treatment gains to 2 sets of untrained (similar) words.

Conclusion This Phase I pilot study provides limited preliminary evidence for the effectiveness of the K-SLP approach in treating childhood apraxia of speech in some children under the conditions specified in this study. Replication of these results in well-controlled studies is needed before this structured and operationalized version of the K-SLP approach can be recommended for clinical use.

Acknowledgments
This research was partially funded by The University of Sydney Faculty Funding Scheme to the first author. The researchers are aware of no further conflicts of interest. Parts of this study were presented at the 2015 Motor Speech Conference, 2016 ASHA Convention, and the 2017 Annual Speech Pathology Australia Conference. We thank the families who participated in this research. We also thank the following treating clinician, assessors, and probe assessors: Lok Tung Wan, Pippa Evans, Jacqueline McKechnie, Natalie Lloyd, and Elisa Calcopietro. We thank Nancy Kaufman for her contribution to operationalizing the treatment protocol.
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