Clinical Forum: Toward Accurate Identification of Developmental Language Disorder Within Linguistically Diverse Schools A language difference due to a child's status as a nonmainstream English dialect speaker or a bilingual English language learner (ELL) does not constitute a language disorder. —Janna B. Oetting LSHSS's Clinical Forum: Toward Accurate Identification of Developmental Language Disorder Within Linguistically Diverse Schools presents five studies that include children ... Announcement
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Announcement  |   April 06, 2018
Clinical Forum: Toward Accurate Identification of Developmental Language Disorder Within Linguistically Diverse Schools
 
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Announcement   |   April 06, 2018
Clinical Forum: Toward Accurate Identification of Developmental Language Disorder Within Linguistically Diverse Schools
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
A language difference due to a child's status as a nonmainstream English dialect speaker or a bilingual English language learner (ELL) does not constitute a language disorder. —Janna B. Oetting
LSHSS's Clinical Forum: Toward Accurate Identification of Developmental Language Disorder Within Linguistically Diverse Schools presents five studies that include children who differ widely in locality, language learning profile, and age. The forum focuses on the concept of disorder within diversity, which encompasses all dialects (i.e., nonmainstream and mainstream) and all language learning contexts (i.e., multilingual and monolingual).
In the prologue, Oetting introduces this framework and discusses the studies included in the forum.
Kyomi D. Gregory and Janna B. Oetting begin the forum with a study of kindergartners living in rural Louisiana. They explore whether teacher questionnaires can be used to reduce the number of direct screens conducted by clinicians.
The study by Julie A. Washington, Lee Branum-Martin, Congying Sun, and Ryan Lee-James involves 835 first through fifth graders, all of whom spoke African American English and lived in an urban area of Georgia. The researchers ask whether a change across grades in children's nonmainstream English responses on the Diagnostic Evaluation of Language Variation: Screening Test–Part II (DELV-ST-II) relates to changes in their skills in oral language and reading.
Brian Weiler, C. Melanie Schuele, Jacob I. Feldman, and Hannah Krimm studied 274 kindergartners in rural Tennessee who mostly spoke Southern White English. They administered the screening portion of the Rice Wexler Test of Early Grammatical Impairment (TEGI) across 2 years of study.
The work by Irina Potapova, Sophia Kelly, Philip N. Combiths, and Sonja L. Pruitt-Lord included Spanish–English language learners attending a preschool in urban California. The authors studied the children's percentage of correctly produced tense and agreement (T/A) morphemes along with two measures of T/A onset (i.e., T/A marker total and T/A marker productivity).
To close out the forum, Lisa M. Bedore, Elizabeth D. Peña, Jissel B. Anaya, Ricardo Nieto, Mirza J. Lugo-Neris, and Alisa Baron examined the diagnostic accuracy of 11 morphosyntactic forms targeted in the Bilingual English–Spanish Assessment (BESA). The participants included 378 first through fourth graders attending schools in urban/suburban areas of Texas, Utah, and Colorado.