Improving Narrative Production in Children With Language Disorders: An Early-Stage Efficacy Study of a Narrative Intervention Program Purpose As noted in this forum, more research is needed to support the work of school-based speech-language pathologists who are designing and implementing interventions for students with language disorders. This article presents the findings of a multiple-baseline, single-subject study that was conducted to assess the outcomes of an intervention designed ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   April 05, 2018
Improving Narrative Production in Children With Language Disorders: An Early-Stage Efficacy Study of a Narrative Intervention Program
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra L. Gillam
    Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan
  • Abbie Olszewski
    Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Nevada, Reno
  • Katie Squires
    Communication Disorders, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant
  • Katie Wolfe
    Educational Studies, University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Timothy Slocum
    Special Education and Rehabilitation, Utah State University, Logan
  • Ronald B. Gillam
    Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan
  • Disclosure: The Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education at Utah State University and the Gillams receive royalties from sales of the narrative intervention program described in the study. Ronald Gillam has a financial interest in the Test of Narrative Language, which was administered to the participants.
    Disclosure: The Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education at Utah State University and the Gillams receive royalties from sales of the narrative intervention program described in the study. Ronald Gillam has a financial interest in the Test of Narrative Language, which was administered to the participants.×
  • Correspondence to Sandra L. Gillam: sandi.gillam@usu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Ashley Meaux
    Editor: Ashley Meaux×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Clinical Forum: Exploring Curriculum-Based Language Assessment and Interventions.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Clinical Forum: Exploring Curriculum-Based Language Assessment and Interventions.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Clinical Forum: Exploring Curriculum-Based Language Assessment and Interventions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   April 05, 2018
Improving Narrative Production in Children With Language Disorders: An Early-Stage Efficacy Study of a Narrative Intervention Program
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2018, Vol. 49, 197-212. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0047
History: Received May 22, 2017 , Revised July 24, 2017 , Accepted August 29, 2017
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2018, Vol. 49, 197-212. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0047
History: Received May 22, 2017; Revised July 24, 2017; Accepted August 29, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose As noted in this forum, more research is needed to support the work of school-based speech-language pathologists who are designing and implementing interventions for students with language disorders. This article presents the findings of a multiple-baseline, single-subject study that was conducted to assess the outcomes of an intervention designed to improve narrative discourse proficiency for children with language disorders.

Method Four school-age children with language disorders that included deficits in narration received an experimental version of a 3-phase narrative language intervention program called Supporting Knowledge in Language and Literacy (Gillam, Gillam, & Laing, 2014). Two additional children remained in baseline throughout the study and served as controls for history, testing, and maturation effects. Measures of story productivity (number of different words) and overall story complexity (Monitoring Indicators of Scholarly Language; Gillam, Gillam, Fargo, Olszewski, & Segura, 2016) were used to assess the children's self-generated narratives.

Results After the onset of treatment, all 4 children who received the narrative intervention made moderate-to-large improvements in narrative productivity (number of different words). Three of the 4 children also made moderate-to-large improvements in narrative complexity (Monitoring Indicators of Scholarly Language). The narrative abilities of the 2 children who did not receive intervention did not change over the course of the study.

Conclusion This study provides evidence for the feasibility of the Supporting Knowledge in Language and Literacy narrative instruction program for improving self-generated narratives by children with language disorders. Future research is needed to determine how gains in oral narration transfer to written narrative skills.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Institute on Educational Sciences, National Center on Special Education Research (R324A100063). The authors thank Chad Bingham and Tami Pyfer for their assistance in carrying out this study and the Logan School District for allowing us access to the participants. Special thanks to Allison Hancock, Natalie Nelson Buttars, Julise Nelson, Casey Ragan, Brittany Martinez, Shannon Davenport, MaryAnn Hammond-Stenquist, Andrea Deakin, Sara Hicken, Ariel Hendrix, Sara Hegsted, Rebecca Mortensen, and Kelli Reese for collecting, transcribing, and coding the stories.
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