Stuttering in Preschool Children: Direct Versus Indirect Treatment Purpose The purpose of this article is to discuss the controversial topic of stuttering in preschool children and how to evaluate the options for treatment, emphasizing the role of external research evidence. Method A hypothetical but realistic case study of a 3-year-old boy who stutters is described. Two ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   January 09, 2018
Stuttering in Preschool Children: Direct Versus Indirect Treatment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn A. Nippold
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Marilyn A. Nippold: nippold@uoregon.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Courtney Byrd
    Editor: Courtney Byrd×
  • Publisher Note: This article is part of the Clinical Forum: Treatment of Stuttering in Children.
    Publisher Note: This article is part of the Clinical Forum: Treatment of Stuttering in Children.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Clinical Forum: Treatment of Stuttering in Children / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   January 09, 2018
Stuttering in Preschool Children: Direct Versus Indirect Treatment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2018, Vol. 49, 4-12. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0066
History: Received June 26, 2017 , Revised August 4, 2017 , Accepted September 12, 2017
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2018, Vol. 49, 4-12. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0066
History: Received June 26, 2017; Revised August 4, 2017; Accepted September 12, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The purpose of this article is to discuss the controversial topic of stuttering in preschool children and how to evaluate the options for treatment, emphasizing the role of external research evidence.

Method A hypothetical but realistic case study of a 3-year-old boy who stutters is described. Two contrasting approaches to treatment are presented, the Lidcombe Program (LP) and the demands and capacities model (DCM). Studies published in peer-reviewed research journals that have examined the effectiveness of each approach are summarized and critiqued.

Results The review indicates that the LP is the preferred treatment approach for stuttering in preschool children and that it offers the best opportunity for rapid success.

Conclusion The LP should be carried out by knowledgeable, experienced, and flexible speech-language pathologists who are able to accommodate the individual needs and differences of every child and family.

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