Clinical Forum: Treatment of Stuttering in Children Many clinicians and researchers feel frustrated at the lack of well-controlled outcome studies examining and contrasting the effectiveness of various stuttering interventions for children. LSHSS's Clinical Forum: Treatment of Stuttering in Children explores how four fluency experts integrate the latest scientific evidence with their clinical expertise. Readers are invited to ... Announcement
Newly Published Free
Announcement  |   January 10, 2018
Clinical Forum: Treatment of Stuttering in Children
 
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Article Information
Announcement   |   January 10, 2018
Clinical Forum: Treatment of Stuttering in Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
Many clinicians and researchers feel frustrated at the lack of well-controlled outcome studies examining and contrasting the effectiveness of various stuttering interventions for children. LSHSS's Clinical Forum: Treatment of Stuttering in Children explores how four fluency experts integrate the latest scientific evidence with their clinical expertise. Readers are invited to explore the articles in this clinical forum, consider the evidence presented, and decide for themselves how they would proceed in applying the best available research evidence to clinical practice.
Courtney T. Byrd and Joseph Donaher introduce the forum. They note that the lack of clarity regarding the success rate for any single approach often results in clinicians relying solely on their clinical expertise to select an approach.
Marilyn A. Nippold and Nan Bernstein Ratner discuss hypothetical scenarios featuring preschool-aged children who stutter. Nippold explores the Lidcombe Program and the demand and capactities model as possible treatment options, summarizing and critiquing peer-reviewed studies regarding the effectiveness of each approach. Bernstein Ratner approaches the case with a full evaluation of the child's profile, including a focus on family preferences as well as the child's response to perhaps multiple evidence-based practice options.
Anne K. Marcotte and Craig E. Coleman address an adolescent who stutters. Marcotte summarizes one possible process that a clinician might follow, combining research evidence, practitioner experience, and consideration of individual preferences. Coleman uses the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to highlight the importance of comprehensive assessment and treatment.