Percent Grammatical Responses as a General Outcome Measure: Initial Validity Purpose This report investigated the validity of using percent grammatical responses (PGR) as a measure for assessing grammaticality. To establish construct validity, we computed the correlation of PGR with another measure of grammar skills and with an unrelated skill area. To establish concurrent validity for PGR, we computed the correlation ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   December 06, 2017
Percent Grammatical Responses as a General Outcome Measure: Initial Validity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarita L. Eisenberg
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Montclair State University, Bloomfield, NJ
  • Ling-Yu Guo
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, University at Buffalo, NY
    Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Sarita Eisenberg: eisenbergs@montclair.edu
  • Editor: Shelley Gray
    Editor: Shelley Gray×
  • Associate Editor: Monique Mills
    Associate Editor: Monique Mills×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   December 06, 2017
Percent Grammatical Responses as a General Outcome Measure: Initial Validity
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0070
History: Received August 29, 2016 , Revised December 29, 2016 , Accepted August 4, 2017
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0070
History: Received August 29, 2016; Revised December 29, 2016; Accepted August 4, 2017

Purpose This report investigated the validity of using percent grammatical responses (PGR) as a measure for assessing grammaticality. To establish construct validity, we computed the correlation of PGR with another measure of grammar skills and with an unrelated skill area. To establish concurrent validity for PGR, we computed the correlation of PGR with a previously validated measure of grammaticality, percent grammatical utterances (PGU), and examined the extent to which PGR and PGU agreed upon pass/fail decisions for children.

Method Participants included 79 3-year-olds from mostly middle socioeconomic status homes. Language samples were elicited by asking children to describe 15 pictures in response to 4 questions per picture. To calculate PGU, children's responses to all 4 questions were segmented into communication units, and each communication unit was evaluated for grammatical errors. To calculate PGR, the entire response to just the first question was evaluated for grammatical errors.

Results PGR scores significantly correlated with a standardized test of grammar (r = .70), but not with a measure of vocabulary (i.e., type–token ratio; r = .11). In addition, PGR scores were significantly correlated with PGU scores (r = .88). Agreement between PGR and PGU was 92% for pass decisions and 94% for fail decisions.

Conclusions The current study establishes the construct validity of PGR as a measure of grammar and supports the use of PGR as a measure to assess grammaticality.

Acknowledgments
The data for this project were collected with support from Award R21DC009218 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders to the first author. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders or the National Institutes of Health. The authors are grateful to the children who participated, as well as to their parents who allowed them to participate, and to the research assistants who collected and transcribed the samples.
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