Conceptual Scoring and Classification Accuracy of Vocabulary Testing in Bilingual Children Purpose This study examined the effects of single-language and conceptual scoring on the vocabulary performance of bilingual children with and without specific language impairment. We assessed classification accuracy across 3 scoring methods. Method Participants included Spanish–English bilingual children (N = 247) aged 5;1 (years;months) to 11;1 with and ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   December 06, 2017
Conceptual Scoring and Classification Accuracy of Vocabulary Testing in Bilingual Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jissel B. Anaya
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Elizabeth D. Peña
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Lisa M. Bedore
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Elizabeth D. Peña is now at the University of California, Irvine.
    Elizabeth D. Peña is now at the University of California, Irvine.×
  • Correspondence to Jissel B. Anaya: jissel.anaya@gmail.com
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Kerry Ebert
    Editor: Kerry Ebert×
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 06, 2017
Conceptual Scoring and Classification Accuracy of Vocabulary Testing in Bilingual Children
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0081
History: Received November 2, 2016 , Revised February 21, 2017 , Accepted August 25, 2017
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0081
History: Received November 2, 2016; Revised February 21, 2017; Accepted August 25, 2017

Purpose This study examined the effects of single-language and conceptual scoring on the vocabulary performance of bilingual children with and without specific language impairment. We assessed classification accuracy across 3 scoring methods.

Method Participants included Spanish–English bilingual children (N = 247) aged 5;1 (years;months) to 11;1 with and without specific language impairment. Children completed the English and bilingual versions of the Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test–Third Edition (Brownell, 2000a, 2001). Six scores, 2 representing monolingual scores in English and Spanish and 4 conceptual scores, were derived. The conceptual scores included within-test conceptual scores, which credited language responses in the other language during test administration, and across-test conceptual scores, which we compiled by examining responses across independent administrations of the test in each language.

Results Across-test conceptual scoring resulted in the highest scores and better overall classification, sensitivity, and specificity than within-test conceptual scoring. Both were superior to monolingual scoring; however, none of the methods achieved minimum standards of 80% accuracy in sensitivity and specificity.

Conclusions Results suggest that bilingual children are not always able to readily access their other language in confrontation naming tasks. Priming or inhibition may play a role in test performance. Across-test conceptual scoring yielded the highest classification accuracy but did not meet minimum standards.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Grant R01DC010366, PI: Peña. This report does not necessarily reflect the views or policy of the NIDCD. We thank the many families, research associates, and research assistants who contributed to this work.
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