Which Preschool Children With Specific Language Impairment Receive Language Intervention? Purpose Potential biases in service provision for preschool children with specific language impairment (SLI) were explored. Method In Study 1, children with SLI receiving treatment (SLI-T) and those with SLI not receiving treatment (SLI-NT) were compared on demographic characteristics and developmental abilities. Study 2 recruited children with articulation ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   November 29, 2017
Which Preschool Children With Specific Language Impairment Receive Language Intervention?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kacie Wittke
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Tammie J. Spaulding
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kacie Wittke: kacie.wittke@uconn.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray
    Editor-in-Chief: Shelley Gray×
  • Editor: Patricia Brooks
    Editor: Patricia Brooks×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   November 29, 2017
Which Preschool Children With Specific Language Impairment Receive Language Intervention?
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0024
History: Received February 26, 2017 , Revised May 17, 2017 , Accepted August 22, 2017
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-17-0024
History: Received February 26, 2017; Revised May 17, 2017; Accepted August 22, 2017

Purpose Potential biases in service provision for preschool children with specific language impairment (SLI) were explored.

Method In Study 1, children with SLI receiving treatment (SLI-T) and those with SLI not receiving treatment (SLI-NT) were compared on demographic characteristics and developmental abilities. Study 2 recruited children with articulation disorders receiving treatment (ARTIC-T) to determine if knowing service provision status influenced the results of Study 1.

Results In Study 1, the SLI-T group was rated by teachers as having poorer executive functioning than children in the SLIT-NT group, and the SLI-T group also came from families whose mothers had more education. These 2 variables alone predicted SLI-T and SLI-NT group membership with 84% accuracy. In Study 2, the ARTIC-T group were perceived as having comparable executive functioning to the SLI-NT group and better than the SLI-T group, indicating that teachers' knowledge of service provision did not influence their ratings of children's executive functioning.

Discussion Preschool children with SLI, whose mothers have higher education levels and whose teachers perceive them as having poorer executive functioning, are more likely to receive intervention. Recognizing service delivery biases is critical for improving early provision of intervention for this population.

Acknowledgments
The current study was supported by the University of Connecticut Institute for the Brain and Cognitive Sciences.
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