Our October Issue Is Here The October 2017 issue of LSHSS begins with a Clinical Focus article by Toby Macrae, who describes and compares the stimulus characteristics of 12 popular tests of speech sound production. He concludes that many of these tests do not elicit adequate samples for comprehensive phonological analyses. Richard M. Arenas, ... Announcement
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Announcement  |   October 05, 2017
Our October Issue Is Here
 
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Article Information
Announcement   |   October 05, 2017
Our October Issue Is Here
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:
The October 2017 issue of LSHSS begins with a Clinical Focus article by Toby Macrae, who describes and compares the stimulus characteristics of 12 popular tests of speech sound production. He concludes that many of these tests do not elicit adequate samples for comprehensive phonological analyses.
Richard M. Arenas, Elizabeth A. Walker, and Jacob J. Oleson used a parent questionnaire to explore stuttering in children who are hard of hearing. They find that the prevalence of stuttering may be higher in this population compared to the general population.
Krystal L. Werfel investigated emergent literacy skills in preschool children with hearing loss who use spoken language. These initial findings from the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) study conclude that children with hearing loss performed more poorly than children with normal hearing on measures of oral language, phonological memory, and conceptual print knowledge.
Marleen F. Westerveld and Jacqueline M. A. Roberts describe oral narrative comprehension and production skills of verbal preschoolers on the autism spectrum. Compared with data on typically developing children, significant difficulties were observed in narrative comprehension, intelligibility, and grammatical accuracy.
Amy J. Shollenbarger, Gregory C. Robinson, Valentina Taran, and Seo-eun Choi explored how typically developing first grade African American English speakers differ from mainstream American English speakers in the completion of rhyming and phoneme segmentation. With CVCC words and nonwords, the African American English group had more responses that reduced the final cluster; this reduction occurred less often when given a model.
In their research note, Rajan A. Sonik, Susan L. Parish, Ilhom Akorbirshoev, Esther Son, and Eliana Rosenthal provide estimates for the prevalence of parent-reported speech-language difficulties in U.S. children, which may be rising, and describe the heightened levels of material hardship in this population, as well as barriers in accessing health care.