How African American English-Speaking First Graders Segment and Rhyme Words and Nonwords With Final Consonant Clusters Purpose This study explored how typically developing 1st grade African American English (AAE) speakers differ from mainstream American English (MAE) speakers in the completion of 2 common phonological awareness tasks (rhyming and phoneme segmentation) when the stimulus items were consonant–vowel–consonant–consonant (CVCC) words and nonwords. Method Forty-nine 1st graders ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 05, 2017
How African American English-Speaking First Graders Segment and Rhyme Words and Nonwords With Final Consonant Clusters
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy J. Shollenbarger
    Arkansas State University, Jonesboro
  • Gregory C. Robinson
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
  • Valentina Taran
    University of Memphis, TN
  • Seo-eun Choi
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Amy Shollenbarger: ashollenbarger@astate.edu
  • Editor: Shelley Gray
    Editor: Shelley Gray×
  • Associate Editor: Janna Oetting
    Associate Editor: Janna Oetting×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 05, 2017
How African American English-Speaking First Graders Segment and Rhyme Words and Nonwords With Final Consonant Clusters
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2017, Vol. 48, 273-285. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0062
History: Received July 28, 2016 , Revised November 8, 2016 , Accepted August 3, 2017
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2017, Vol. 48, 273-285. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0062
History: Received July 28, 2016; Revised November 8, 2016; Accepted August 3, 2017

Purpose This study explored how typically developing 1st grade African American English (AAE) speakers differ from mainstream American English (MAE) speakers in the completion of 2 common phonological awareness tasks (rhyming and phoneme segmentation) when the stimulus items were consonant–vowel–consonant–consonant (CVCC) words and nonwords.

Method Forty-nine 1st graders met criteria for 2 dialect groups: AAE and MAE. Three conditions were tested in each rhyme and segmentation task: Real Words No Model, Real Words With a Model, and Nonwords With a Model.

Results The AAE group had significantly more responses that rhymed CVCC words with consonant–vowel–consonant words and segmented CVCC words as consonant–vowel–consonant than the MAE group across all experimental conditions. In the rhyming task, the presence of a model in the real word condition elicited more reduced final cluster responses for both groups. In the segmentation task, the MAE group was at ceiling, so only the AAE group changed across the different stimulus presentations and reduced the final cluster less often when given a model.

Conclusion Rhyming and phoneme segmentation performance can be influenced by a child's dialect when CVCC words are used.

Acknowledgments
We extend our gratitude to the administrators, teachers, and students in the schools that participated in our study.
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