Population Estimates, Health Care Characteristics, and Material Hardship Experiences of U.S. Children With Parent-Reported Speech-Language Difficulties: Evidence From Three Nationally Representative Surveys Purpose To provide estimates for the prevalence of parent-reported speech-language difficulties in U.S. children, and to describe the levels of health care access and material hardship in this population. Method We tabulated descriptive and bivariate statistics using cross-sectional data from the 2007 and 2011/2012 iterations of the National ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   August 11, 2017
Population Estimates, Health Care Characteristics, and Material Hardship Experiences of U.S. Children With Parent-Reported Speech-Language Difficulties: Evidence From Three Nationally Representative Surveys
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rajan A. Sonik
    The Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
  • Susan L. Parish
    The Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
  • Ilhom Akorbirshoev
    The Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
  • Esther Son
    College of Staten Island, The City University of New York
  • Eliana Rosenthal
    The Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, The Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rajan A. Sonik: sonik@brandeis.edu
  • Editor: Shelley Gray
    Editor: Shelley Gray×
  • Associate Editor: Toby Macrae
    Associate Editor: Toby Macrae×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 11, 2017
Population Estimates, Health Care Characteristics, and Material Hardship Experiences of U.S. Children With Parent-Reported Speech-Language Difficulties: Evidence From Three Nationally Representative Surveys
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0072
History: Received September 19, 2016 , Revised May 25, 2017 , Accepted May 30, 2017
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0072
History: Received September 19, 2016; Revised May 25, 2017; Accepted May 30, 2017

Purpose To provide estimates for the prevalence of parent-reported speech-language difficulties in U.S. children, and to describe the levels of health care access and material hardship in this population.

Method We tabulated descriptive and bivariate statistics using cross-sectional data from the 2007 and 2011/2012 iterations of the National Survey of Children's Health, the 2005/2006 and 2009/2010 iterations of the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, and the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation.

Results Prevalence estimates ranged from 1.8% to 5.0%, with data from two of the three surveys preliminarily indicating increased prevalence in recent years. The largest health care challenge was in accessing care coordination, with 49%–56% of children with parent-reported speech-language difficulties lacking full access. Children with parent-reported speech-language difficulties were more likely than peers without any indications of speech-language difficulties to live in households experiencing each measured material hardship and participating in each measured public benefit program (e.g., 20%–22% experiencing food insecurity, compared to 11%–14% of their peers without any indications of speech-language difficulties).

Conclusions We found mixed preliminary evidence to suggest that the prevalence of parent-reported speech-language difficulties among children may be rising. These children face heightened levels of material hardship and barriers in accessing health care.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Principal investigator: Sandra Magaña. Grant # 90RT5020-01-00. However, the contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Health and Human Services, and you should not assume endorsement by the federal government.
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