Interactive Book Reading to Accelerate Word Learning by Kindergarten Children With Specific Language Impairment: Identifying Adequate Progress and Successful Learning Patterns Purpose The goal of this study was to provide guidance to clinicians on early benchmarks of successful word learning in an interactive book reading treatment and to examine how encoding and memory evolution during treatment contribute to word learning outcomes by kindergarten children with specific language impairment (SLI). ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   April 20, 2017
Interactive Book Reading to Accelerate Word Learning by Kindergarten Children With Specific Language Impairment: Identifying Adequate Progress and Successful Learning Patterns
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Holly L. Storkel
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Rouzana Komesidou
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Kandace K. Fleming
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Rebecca Swinburne Romine
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Holly L. Storkel: hstorkel@ku.edu
  • Editor: Shelley Gray
    Editor: Shelley Gray×
  • Associate Editor: Monique Mills
    Associate Editor: Monique Mills×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   April 20, 2017
Interactive Book Reading to Accelerate Word Learning by Kindergarten Children With Specific Language Impairment: Identifying Adequate Progress and Successful Learning Patterns
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2017, Vol. 48, 108-124. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0058
History: Received July 18, 2016 , Revised October 31, 2016 , Accepted December 5, 2016
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2017, Vol. 48, 108-124. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0058
History: Received July 18, 2016; Revised October 31, 2016; Accepted December 5, 2016

Purpose The goal of this study was to provide guidance to clinicians on early benchmarks of successful word learning in an interactive book reading treatment and to examine how encoding and memory evolution during treatment contribute to word learning outcomes by kindergarten children with specific language impairment (SLI).

Method Twenty-seven kindergarten children with SLI participated in a preliminary clinical trial using interactive book reading to teach 30 new words. Word learning was assessed at 4 points during treatment through a picture naming test.

Results The results indicate that the following performance during treatment was cause for concern, indicating a need to modify the treatment: naming 0–1 treated words correctly at Naming Test 1; naming 0–2 treated words correctly at Naming Test 2; naming 0–3 treated words correctly at Naming Test 3. In addition, the results showed that encoding was the primary limiting factor in word learning, but rmemory evolution also contributed (albeit to a lesser degree) to word learning success.

Conclusion Case illustrations demonstrate how a clinician's understanding of a child's word learning strengths and weaknesses develop over the course of treatment, substantiating the importance of regular data collection and clinical decision-making to ensure the best possible outcomes for each individual child.

Acknowledgments
The project described was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants DC 012824, DC05803, and HD02528. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of Health. We would like to thank staff of the Participant Recruitment and Management Core of the Center for Biobehavioral Neurosciences of Communication Disorders (DC05803) for assistance with recruitment of preschools and children; staff of the Research Design and Analysis Unit of the Lifespan Institute (supported by HD02528) for assistance with study design; and staff of the Word and Sound Learning Lab (supported by DC 012824) for their contributions to stimulus creation, participant recruitment, data collection, data processing, and reliability calculations.
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