Commentary on “Reading Comprehension Is Not a Single Ability”: Implications for Child Language Intervention Purpose This commentary responds to the implications for child language intervention of Catts and Kamhi's (2017)  call to move from viewing reading comprehension as a single ability to recognizing it as a complex constellation of reader, text, and activity. Method Reading comprehension, as Catts and Kamhi explain, is ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   April 20, 2017
Commentary on “Reading Comprehension Is Not a Single Ability”: Implications for Child Language Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Teresa A. Ukrainetz
    University of Wyoming
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to: Teresa Ukrainetz, who is now at the Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education, Utah State University, Logan: teresa.ukrainetz@usu.edu
  • Editor: Shelley Gray
    Editor: Shelley Gray×
  • Associate Editor: Shelley Gray
    Associate Editor: Shelley Gray×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: Reading Comprehension Is Not a Single Ability
Clinical Focus   |   April 20, 2017
Commentary on “Reading Comprehension Is Not a Single Ability”: Implications for Child Language Intervention
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2017, Vol. 48, 92-97. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0031
History: Received April 20, 2016 , Revised September 21, 2016 , Accepted September 23, 2016
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2017, Vol. 48, 92-97. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0031
History: Received April 20, 2016; Revised September 21, 2016; Accepted September 23, 2016

Purpose This commentary responds to the implications for child language intervention of Catts and Kamhi's (2017)  call to move from viewing reading comprehension as a single ability to recognizing it as a complex constellation of reader, text, and activity.

Method Reading comprehension, as Catts and Kamhi explain, is very complicated. In this commentary, I consider how comprehension has been taught and the directions in which it is moving. I consider how speech-language pathologists (SLPs), with their distinctive expertise and resources, can contribute to effective reading comprehension instruction. I build from Catts and Kamhi's emphasis on the importance of context and knowledge, using the approaches of staying on topic, close reading, and incorporating quality features of intervention. I consider whether and how SLPs should treat language skills and comprehension strategies to achieve noticeable changes in their students' reading comprehension.

Conclusion Within this multidimensional view of reading comprehension, SLPs can make strategic, meaningful contributions to improving the reading comprehension of students with language impairments.

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