Beyond Comprehension Strategy Instruction: What's Next? Purpose In this article, we respond to Catts and Kamhi's (2017)  argument that reading comprehension is not a single ability. Method We provide a brief review of the impact of strategy instruction, the importance of knowledge in reading comprehension, and possible avenues for future research and practice. ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   April 20, 2017
Beyond Comprehension Strategy Instruction: What's Next?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy M. Elleman
    Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro
  • Donald L. Compton
    Florida Center for Reading Research, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Amy M. Elleman: amy.elleman@mtsu.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Shelley Gray
    Editor and Associate Editor: Shelley Gray×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: Reading Comprehension Is Not a Single Ability
Clinical Focus   |   April 20, 2017
Beyond Comprehension Strategy Instruction: What's Next?
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2017, Vol. 48, 84-91. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0036
History: Received April 30, 2016 , Revised October 24, 2016 , Accepted October 28, 2016
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2017, Vol. 48, 84-91. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0036
History: Received April 30, 2016; Revised October 24, 2016; Accepted October 28, 2016

Purpose In this article, we respond to Catts and Kamhi's (2017)  argument that reading comprehension is not a single ability.

Method We provide a brief review of the impact of strategy instruction, the importance of knowledge in reading comprehension, and possible avenues for future research and practice.

Results We agree with Catts and Kamhi's argument that reading comprehension is a complex endeavor and that current recommended practices do not reflect the complexity of the construct. Knowledge building, despite its important role in comprehension, has been relegated to a back seat in reading comprehension instruction. In the final section of the article, we outline possible avenues for research and practice (e.g., generative language instruction, dialogic approaches to knowledge building, analogical reasoning and disciplinary literacy, the use of graphics and media, inference instruction) for improving reading-comprehension outcomes.

Conclusions Reading comprehension is a complex ability, and comprehension instruction should reflect this complexity. If we want to have an impact on long-term growth in reading comprehension, we will need to expand our current repertoire of instructional methods to include approaches that support the acquisition and integration of knowledge across a variety of texts and topics.

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