An Interactive View of Reading Comprehension: Implications for Assessment Purpose This clinical focus article explores further the multidimensional view of reading comprehension put forward by Catts and Kamhi (2017)  in this clinical forum and its implications for reading assessment. Method It is argued that a multidimensional or interactive view of reading predicts variability in student performance on ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   April 20, 2017
An Interactive View of Reading Comprehension: Implications for Assessment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen K. Wixson
    The University of North Carolina, Greensboro
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Karen K. Wixson: kwixson@uncg.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Shelley Gray
    Editor and Associate Editor: Shelley Gray×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Forum: Reading Comprehension Is Not a Single Ability
Clinical Focus   |   April 20, 2017
An Interactive View of Reading Comprehension: Implications for Assessment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2017, Vol. 48, 77-83. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0030
History: Received April 18, 2016 , Revised October 3, 2016 , Accepted October 11, 2016
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2017, Vol. 48, 77-83. doi:10.1044/2017_LSHSS-16-0030
History: Received April 18, 2016; Revised October 3, 2016; Accepted October 11, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This clinical focus article explores further the multidimensional view of reading comprehension put forward by Catts and Kamhi (2017)  in this clinical forum and its implications for reading assessment.

Method It is argued that a multidimensional or interactive view of reading predicts variability in student performance on reading assessments as a function of the interaction among reader, text, and task factors.

Result Student performance on any given reading assessment should be interpreted in relation to the specific reading demands of the assessment, rather than as a fixed ability that generalizes to any given reading situation.

Conclusion This view implies a different approach to the use of both summative and classroom assessment than is currently common practice.

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