Interactive Book Reading to Accelerate Word Learning by Kindergarten Children With Specific Language Impairment: Identifying an Adequate Intensity and Variation in Treatment Response Purpose This study sought to identify an adequate intensity of interactive book reading for new word learning by children with specific language impairment (SLI) and to examine variability in treatment response. Method An escalation design adapted from nontoxic drug trials (Hunsberger, Rubinstein, Dancey, & Korn, 2005) was used ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2017
Interactive Book Reading to Accelerate Word Learning by Kindergarten Children With Specific Language Impairment: Identifying an Adequate Intensity and Variation in Treatment Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Holly L. Storkel
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Krista Voelmle
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Veronica Fierro
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Kelsey Flake
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Kandace K. Fleming
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Rebecca Swinburne Romine
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Holly L. Storkel: hstorkel@ku.edu
  • Editor: Shelley Gray
    Editor: Shelley Gray×
  • Associate Editor: Margaret Kjelgaard
    Associate Editor: Margaret Kjelgaard×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2017
Interactive Book Reading to Accelerate Word Learning by Kindergarten Children With Specific Language Impairment: Identifying an Adequate Intensity and Variation in Treatment Response
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2017, Vol. 48, 16-30. doi:10.1044/2016_LSHSS-16-0014
History: Received February 23, 2016 , Revised May 24, 2016 , Accepted May 27, 2016
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2017, Vol. 48, 16-30. doi:10.1044/2016_LSHSS-16-0014
History: Received February 23, 2016; Revised May 24, 2016; Accepted May 27, 2016

Purpose This study sought to identify an adequate intensity of interactive book reading for new word learning by children with specific language impairment (SLI) and to examine variability in treatment response.

Method An escalation design adapted from nontoxic drug trials (Hunsberger, Rubinstein, Dancey, & Korn, 2005) was used in this Phase I/II preliminary clinical trial. A total of 27 kindergarten children with SLI were randomized to 1 of 4 intensities of interactive book reading: 12, 24, 36, or 48 exposures. Word learning was monitored through a definition task and a naming task. An intensity response curve was examined to identify the adequate intensity. Correlations and classification accuracy were used to examine variation in response to treatment relative to pretreatment and early treatment measures.

Results Response to treatment improved as intensity increased from 12 to 24 to 36 exposures, and then no further improvements were observed as intensity increased to 48 exposures. There was variability in treatment response: Children with poor phonological awareness, low vocabulary, and/or poor nonword repetition were less likely to respond to treatment.

Conclusion The adequate intensity for this version of interactive book reading was 36 exposures, but further development of the treatment is needed to increase the benefit for children with SLI.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants DC012824, DC05803, HD02528, and NCATS-UL1TR000001. The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. We thank the staff of the Participant Recruitment and Management Core of the Center for Biobehavioral Neurosciences of Communication Disorders (supported by DC05803) for assistance with recruitment of schools and children; the staff of the Research Design and Analysis Unit of the Lifespan Institute (supported by HD02528) for assistance with study design; Frontiers: The Heartland Institute for Clinical and Translational Research for REDCap support (supported by NCATS-UL1TR000001); and the staff of the Word and Sound Learning Lab (supported by DC012824) for their contributions to stimulus creation, participant recruitment, data collection, data processing, and reliability calculations. Portions of the data were presented previously at the 2015 Kansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, the 2015 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and the 2015 Symposium for Research in Child Language Disorders. Clinical application of the methods and findings was described previously in Voelmle and Storkel (2015)  and Komesidou and Storkel (2015) .
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