Strategies for Teachers to Manage Stuttering in the Classroom: A Call for Research Purpose This clinical focus article highlights the need for future research involving ways to assist children who stutter in the classroom. Method The 4 most commonly recommended strategies for teachers were found via searches of electronic databases and personal libraries of the authors. The peer-reviewed evidence for each ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   October 01, 2016
Strategies for Teachers to Manage Stuttering in the Classroom: A Call for Research
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jason H. Davidow
    Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
  • Lisa Zaroogian
    Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY
  • Mauricio A. Garcia-Barrera
    University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jason H. Davidow: jason.davidow@hofstra.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Ann Packman
    Associate Editor: Ann Packman×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / School-Based Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   October 01, 2016
Strategies for Teachers to Manage Stuttering in the Classroom: A Call for Research
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2016, Vol. 47, 283-296. doi:10.1044/2016_LSHSS-15-0057
History: Received July 13, 2015 , Revised August 15, 2015 , Accepted May 6, 2016
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2016, Vol. 47, 283-296. doi:10.1044/2016_LSHSS-15-0057
History: Received July 13, 2015; Revised August 15, 2015; Accepted May 6, 2016

Purpose This clinical focus article highlights the need for future research involving ways to assist children who stutter in the classroom.

Method The 4 most commonly recommended strategies for teachers were found via searches of electronic databases and personal libraries of the authors. The peer-reviewed evidence for each recommendation was subsequently located and detailed.

Results There are varying amounts of evidence for the 4 recommended teacher strategies outside of the classroom, but there are no data for 2 of the strategies, and minimal data for the others, in a classroom setting. That is, there is virtually no evidence regarding whether or not the actions put forth influence, for example, stuttering frequency, stuttering severity, participation, or the social, emotional, and cognitive components of stuttering in the classroom.

Conclusion There is a need for researchers and speech-language pathologists in the schools to study the outcomes of teacher strategies in the classroom for children who stutter.

Acknowledgment
We offer a special thanks to Rosemarie Dominguez for her help during various stages of this project.
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