Do Live Versus Audio-Recorded Narrative Stimuli Influence Young Children's Narrative Comprehension and Retell Quality? Purpose The primary aim of the present study was to examine whether different ways of presenting narrative stimuli (i.e., live narrative stimuli versus audio-recorded narrative stimuli) influence children's performances on narrative comprehension and oral-retell quality. Method Children in kindergarten (n = 54), second grade (n = 74), and ... Research Note
Research Note  |   January 01, 2016
Do Live Versus Audio-Recorded Narrative Stimuli Influence Young Children's Narrative Comprehension and Retell Quality?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Young-Suk Grace Kim
    College of Education and Florida Center for Reading Research, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Young-Suk Grace Kim: ykim@fcrr.org
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Masterson
    Associate Editor: Julie Masterson×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Research Notes
Research Note   |   January 01, 2016
Do Live Versus Audio-Recorded Narrative Stimuli Influence Young Children's Narrative Comprehension and Retell Quality?
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2016, Vol. 47, 77-86. doi:10.1044/2015_LSHSS-15-0027
History: Received May 15, 2015 , Revised August 20, 2015 , Accepted November 6, 2015
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2016, Vol. 47, 77-86. doi:10.1044/2015_LSHSS-15-0027
History: Received May 15, 2015; Revised August 20, 2015; Accepted November 6, 2015

Purpose The primary aim of the present study was to examine whether different ways of presenting narrative stimuli (i.e., live narrative stimuli versus audio-recorded narrative stimuli) influence children's performances on narrative comprehension and oral-retell quality.

Method Children in kindergarten (n = 54), second grade (n = 74), and fourth grade (n = 65) were matched on their performance on a standardized oral-language comprehension task and then were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 conditions that differed in how narrative stimuli were presented to children: live narrative stimuli and audio-recorded narrative stimuli.

Results Kindergartners and 2nd graders in the live condition had higher mean performance on narrative comprehension, with effect sizes of .43 and .39, respectively, after accounting for age, gender, and school. No differences were found in narrative comprehension for children in 4th grade. Children's oral-retell quality did not differ as a function of condition in any grade.

Conclusion These results suggest that how narrative stimuli are presented to children (i.e., live versus audio-recorded narrative stimuli) may affect children's narrative comprehension, particularly for young children in kindergarten and Grade 2. Implications for assessment and instruction are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education Grant R305A130131. The views expressed herein are those of the author and have not been reviewed or approved by the granting agencies. The author wishes to thank the participating schools and children.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access