From the Editor… Brian A. Goldstein I have spent my entire research career examining phonological development in Spanish-speaking children. The children in the early studies were monolingual Spanish speakers who had little or no exposure to English. In the past few years, I have extended my work to include bilingual children who ... Editorial
Editorial  |   July 01, 2005
From the Editor…
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   July 01, 2005
From the Editor…
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 167. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3603.167
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2005, Vol. 36, 167. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3603.167
Brian A. Goldstein
I have spent my entire research career examining phonological development in Spanish-speaking children. The children in the early studies were monolingual Spanish speakers who had little or no exposure to English. In the past few years, I have extended my work to include bilingual children who either speak Spanish and English from birth (often termed “simultaneous” bilinguals) or speak Spanish initially and then begin to acquire English once they enter school (often termed “sequential” bilinguals).
When I began my research career, there were very few scholars doing any programmatic research with speakers of languages other than English. Thus, there was a paucity of research on speakers who were not monolingual English speaking. The majority of the studies that did exist focused on a description of language form and/or might also contain a case study. Many of these studies, however, were not germane to speech-language pathology. Fortunately, that situation has changed—in time for the burgeoning of bilingual children in the schools. I should note that I am using the term “bilingual” in a broad sense here—to include speakers who have very little exposure to and use of two languages to those who have much more “equal” exposure to and use of both languages. Truly “equal” exposure to and use of both languages is probably illusory Valdés & Figueroa, 1994).
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