From the Editor… Ruth Huntley Bahr Although learning to read has become a national priority, current statistics continue to paint a disturbing picture for children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Data from the 2000 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP; U. S. Department of Education. NCES, 2001) revealed that 37% of ... Editorial
Editorial  |   January 01, 2003
From the Editor…
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   January 01, 2003
From the Editor…
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2003, Vol. 34, 3. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3401.03
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2003, Vol. 34, 3. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3401.03
Ruth Huntley Bahr
Although learning to read has become a national priority, current statistics continue to paint a disturbing picture for children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Data from the 2000 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP; U. S. Department of Education. NCES, 2001) revealed that 37% of all students in Fourth grade were reading below a basic proficiency level. More disturbing was that more than 55% of the Hispanic and African American children in grade 4 fell below the basic reading level. It is obvious that many of our children are having difficulty reading.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access