From the Editor… Ruth Huntley Bahr In 1992, Marc Fey coordinated a clinical forum for LSHSS on phonological assessment and treatment. The contributors to that issue were asked to describe the impact of phonological theory on the treatment of speech sound disorders. These experts were in agreement that the adoption of ... Editorial
Editorial  |   October 01, 2001
From the Editor…
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   October 01, 2001
From the Editor…
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2001, Vol. 32, 211. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3204.211
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2001, Vol. 32, 211. doi:10.1044/0161-1461.3204.211
Ruth Huntley Bahr
In 1992, Marc Fey coordinated a clinical forum for LSHSS on phonological assessment and treatment. The contributors to that issue were asked to describe the impact of phonological theory on the treatment of speech sound disorders. These experts were in agreement that the adoption of a phonological framework for assessment and treatment would consider cognitive and articulatory aspects of production. They focused on the benefits of phonology in describing error types (Edwards, 1992; Elbert, 1992) and demonstrated how phonological principles could be implemented in treatment (Hodson, 1992). Finally, these authors stressed the need to consider higher level language abilities, including syntax and semantics (Hoffman, 1992), phonological awareness (Kamhi, 1992), and aspects of syllable and word structure as illustrated by contemporary theories of phonology (Schwartz, 1992). Fey (1992) concluded that “phonological principles should be viewed as adding new dimensions and a new perspective to an old problem, not simply as refuting established principles” (p. 225).
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