Factors Influencing Choices of Contextualized Versus Traditional Practices With Children and Adolescents Who Have Traumatic Brain Injury Purpose This preliminary investigation examined speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') use of contextualized practices (i.e., functional, personally relevant, nonhierarchical, and collaborative) compared with traditional practices (i.e., clinical, generic, hierarchical, and expert driven) with school-age children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods An electronic survey asked SLPs about their ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2015
Factors Influencing Choices of Contextualized Versus Traditional Practices With Children and Adolescents Who Have Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather Koole
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI
  • Nickola W. Nelson
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI
  • Amy B. Curtis
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Heather Koole, who is now at Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI: hkk3@calvin.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: LaVae Hoffman
    Associate Editor: LaVae Hoffman×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2015
Factors Influencing Choices of Contextualized Versus Traditional Practices With Children and Adolescents Who Have Traumatic Brain Injury
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2015, Vol. 46, 352-361. doi:10.1044/2015_LSHSS-14-0109
History: Received December 5, 2014 , Revised April 9, 2015 , Accepted August 14, 2015
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2015, Vol. 46, 352-361. doi:10.1044/2015_LSHSS-14-0109
History: Received December 5, 2014; Revised April 9, 2015; Accepted August 14, 2015

Purpose This preliminary investigation examined speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') use of contextualized practices (i.e., functional, personally relevant, nonhierarchical, and collaborative) compared with traditional practices (i.e., clinical, generic, hierarchical, and expert driven) with school-age children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Methods An electronic survey asked SLPs about their use of clinical activities described as more or less contextualized. Research questions focused on frequency of using contextualized practices and factors associated with their use or nonuse.

Results Seventy responses met criteria for analysis; 98% of these participants reported using at least 1 contextualized practice. Higher use of contextualized practices was associated with working in schools compared to health care settings, access to experts, and greater experience with TBI. Most frequently cited reasons for not using contextualized practices included not fitting the student and scheduling issues.

Conclusions Factors associated with using contextualized practices suggest that access to experts and experience with TBI are critical components for facilitating contextualized practice recommendations. Reasons for not using certain contextualized practices highlight the need to address scheduling issues and to increase education about practices that may best meet the unique needs of students with TBI.

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