Effects of Coaching on Educators' and Preschoolers' Use of References to Print and Phonological Awareness During a Small-Group Craft/Writing Activity Purpose The current study investigated the effects of coaching as part of an emergent literacy professional development program to increase early childhood educators' use of verbal references to print and phonological awareness during interactions with children. Method Thirty-one educators and 4 children from each of their classrooms (N ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2015
Effects of Coaching on Educators' and Preschoolers' Use of References to Print and Phonological Awareness During a Small-Group Craft/Writing Activity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Trelani F. Milburn
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Kathleen Hipfner-Boucher
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Elaine Weitzman
    The Hanen Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Janice Greenberg
    The Hanen Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Janette Pelletier
    Ontario Institute of Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Luigi Girolametto
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Trelani Milburn: trelani.milburn@mail.utoronto.ca
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Karen Smith-Lock
    Associate Editor: Karen Smith-Lock×
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2015
Effects of Coaching on Educators' and Preschoolers' Use of References to Print and Phonological Awareness During a Small-Group Craft/Writing Activity
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2015, Vol. 46, 94-111. doi:10.1044/2015_LSHSS-14-0020
History: Received February 7, 2014 , Revised June 10, 2014 , Accepted November 25, 2014
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2015, Vol. 46, 94-111. doi:10.1044/2015_LSHSS-14-0020
History: Received February 7, 2014; Revised June 10, 2014; Accepted November 25, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose The current study investigated the effects of coaching as part of an emergent literacy professional development program to increase early childhood educators' use of verbal references to print and phonological awareness during interactions with children.

Method Thirty-one educators and 4 children from each of their classrooms (N = 121) were randomly assigned to an experimental group (21 hr of in-service workshops plus 5 coaching sessions) and a comparison group (workshops alone). The in-service workshops included instruction on how to talk about print and phonological awareness during a post-story craft/writing activity. All educators were video-recorded during a 15-min craft/writing activity with a small group of preschoolers at pretest and posttest. All videotapes were transcribed and coded for verbal references to print and phonological awareness by the educators and children.

Results Although at posttest, there were no significant group differences in the educators' or the children's references to print as measured by rate per minute, both the educators and the children in the experimental group used a significantly higher rate per minute of references to phonological awareness relative to the comparison group.

Conclusion Professional development that included coaching with a speech-language pathologist enabled educators and children to engage in more phonological awareness talk during this activity.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) grant, awarded to Luigi Girolametto, Elaine Weitzman, and Janette Pelletier. In addition, the first author (Trelani Milburn) was awarded a Doctoral Fellowship Award by SSHRC as well as the H. J. Watson Ontario Graduate Scholarship for her doctoral work, which included this study. We would like to express our gratitude to the staff, parents, and children of the participating child care centers as well as to the research assistants who took part in data collection and preparation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access