Consequences of Co-Occurring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder on Children's Language Impairments Purpose Co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and communication disorders represent a frequently encountered challenge for school-based practitioners. The purpose of the present study was to examine in more detail the clinical phenomenology of co-occurring ADHD and language impairments (LIs). Method Measures of nonword repetition, sentence recall, and tense marking ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2015
Consequences of Co-Occurring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder on Children's Language Impairments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Andrea C. Ash
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Tiffany P. Hogan
    MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Sean M. Redmond: sean.redmond@health.utah.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Sonja Pruitt-Lord
    Associate Editor: Sonja Pruitt-Lord×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2015
Consequences of Co-Occurring Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder on Children's Language Impairments
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2015, Vol. 46, 68-80. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-14-0045
History: Received April 11, 2014 , Revised June 26, 2014 , Accepted October 1, 2014
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2015, Vol. 46, 68-80. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-14-0045
History: Received April 11, 2014; Revised June 26, 2014; Accepted October 1, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose Co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and communication disorders represent a frequently encountered challenge for school-based practitioners. The purpose of the present study was to examine in more detail the clinical phenomenology of co-occurring ADHD and language impairments (LIs).

Method Measures of nonword repetition, sentence recall, and tense marking were collected from 57 seven- to nine-year-old children. The performances of children with ADHD+LI status were compared with those of children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typical development (TD).

Results ADHD status had no independent detrimental impact on the affected children's LIs (SLI = ADHD+LI < TD). A modest positive correlation was found between the severity of children's ADHD symptoms and their sentence recall performance, suggesting a tendency for affected children who had higher levels of ADHD symptoms to perform better than those children with lower levels.

Conclusion These outcomes are difficult to reconcile with attention-deficit/information-processing accounts of the core deficits associated with SLI. Potential protective mechanisms associated with ADHD status are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this research was provided by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R03DC008382 (“Psycholinguistic and Socioemotional Profiling of SLI and ADHD”) and R01DC011023 (“Co-Occurrence of Language and Attention Difficulties in Children”). Portions of this study were presented at the June 2013 Symposium for Research in Child Language Disorders in Madison, Wisconsin. We are greatly indebted to the participants and their families for their generosity and patience. Appreciation is also extended to the following people for their assistance in recruiting potential participants: Rebecca Garda and Deb Luker (Jordan School District), Lisa Holmstead (Salt Lake City School District), Linda Smith (Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder), Carrie Francis (Boys and Girls Clubs), Sam Goldstein (Neurology, Learning, and Behavior Center), Janet Goldstein (University of Utah Speech, Language, and Hearing Clinic), and Sandra Gillam (Utah State University). Several graduate and undergraduate students from the University of Utah Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders assisted in various aspects of the project and deserve recognition for their contributions: David Aamodt, Chelsea Ash, Lyndi Ballard, Peter Behnke, Hannah Caron, Kimber Campbell, Jessica Carrizo, Jamie Dressler, Olivia Erickson, Micah Foster, Kristin Hatch, Nathan Lily, Amy Ludlow, Kristi Moon, Elie Munyankindi, Britta Rajamaki, Michelle Stettler, Jennifer Thinnes Whittaker, McKenzie Rohde, Heather Thompson, and Melissa Whitchurch.
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