Content Coverage of Single-Word Tests Used to Assess Common Phonological Error Patterns Purpose This review evaluated whether 9 single-word tests of phonological error patterns provide adequate content coverage to accurately identify error patterns that are active in a child's speech. Method Tests in the current study were considered to display sufficient opportunities to assess common phonological error patterns if they ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2015
Content Coverage of Single-Word Tests Used to Assess Common Phonological Error Patterns
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cecilia Kirk
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Laura Vigeland
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Cecilia Kirk: ceciliak@uoregon.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley
    Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2015
Content Coverage of Single-Word Tests Used to Assess Common Phonological Error Patterns
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2015, Vol. 46, 14-29. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-13-0054
History: Received July 29, 2013 , Revised February 17, 2014 , Accepted August 26, 2014
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2015, Vol. 46, 14-29. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-13-0054
History: Received July 29, 2013; Revised February 17, 2014; Accepted August 26, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This review evaluated whether 9 single-word tests of phonological error patterns provide adequate content coverage to accurately identify error patterns that are active in a child's speech.

Method Tests in the current study were considered to display sufficient opportunities to assess common phonological error patterns if they provided at least 4 opportunities for each of 11 error patterns. The target phonemes for these error patterns had to occur as singletons (except for final consonant deletion and cluster reduction) and in stressed syllables (except for weak syllable deletion). Error patterns for which positional asymmetries have been documented (velar fronting, stopping of fricatives and affricates, and cluster reduction) required 4 opportunities in both word-initial and word-final position to meet the study's criterion.

Results None of the tests provided 4 opportunities for every error pattern, the criterion level used in this study. Error patterns that tended to be underrepresented across tests included weak syllable deletion, reduction of word-final clusters, fronting of velars, gliding of liquids, and deaffrication.

Conclusion This review will allow clinicians to gain a deeper understanding of the methods used to assess phonological error patterns in single-word tests.

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