Speech Abilities in Preschool Children With Speech Sound Disorder With and Without Co-Occurring Language Impairment Purpose The authors compared preschool children with co-occurring speech sound disorder (SSD) and language impairment (LI) to children with SSD only in their numbers and types of speech sound errors. Method In this post hoc quasi-experimental study, independent samples t tests were used to compare the groups in ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2014
Speech Abilities in Preschool Children With Speech Sound Disorder With and Without Co-Occurring Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Toby Macrae
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Ann A. Tyler
    Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Toby Macrae: toby.macrae@cci.fsu.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Linda Larrivee
    Associate Editor: Linda Larrivee×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2014
Speech Abilities in Preschool Children With Speech Sound Disorder With and Without Co-Occurring Language Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2014, Vol. 45, 302-313. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-13-0081
History: Received October 16, 2013 , Revised April 30, 2014 , Accepted July 26, 2014
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2014, Vol. 45, 302-313. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-13-0081
History: Received October 16, 2013; Revised April 30, 2014; Accepted July 26, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose The authors compared preschool children with co-occurring speech sound disorder (SSD) and language impairment (LI) to children with SSD only in their numbers and types of speech sound errors.

Method In this post hoc quasi-experimental study, independent samples t tests were used to compare the groups in the standard score from different tests of articulation/phonology, percent consonants correct, and the number of omission, substitution, distortion, typical, and atypical error patterns used in the production of different wordlists that had similar levels of phonetic and structural complexity.

Results In comparison with children with SSD only, children with SSD and LI used similar numbers but different types of errors, including more omission patterns (p < .001, d = 1.55) and fewer distortion patterns (p = .022, d = 1.03). There were no significant differences in substitution, typical, and atypical error pattern use.

Conclusions Frequent omission error pattern use may reflect a more compromised linguistic system characterized by absent phonological representations for target sounds (see Shriberg et al., 2005). Research is required to examine the diagnostic potential of early frequent omission error pattern use in predicting later diagnoses of co-occurring SSD and LI and/or reading problems.

Acknowledgments
This research is based, in part, on data from a dissertation submitted by the first author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Speech Pathology from the University of Nevada, Reno. This research was initially presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 2011, San Diego, CA.
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