A Psychometric Review of Norm-Referenced Tests Used to Assess Phonological Error Patterns Purpose The authors provide a review of the psychometric properties of 6 norm-referenced tests designed to measure children's phonological error patterns. Three aspects of the tests' psychometric adequacy were evaluated: the normative sample, reliability, and validity. Method The specific criteria used for determining the psychometric adequacy of these ... Review
Review  |   October 01, 2014
A Psychometric Review of Norm-Referenced Tests Used to Assess Phonological Error Patterns
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cecilia Kirk
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Laura Vigeland
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Cecilia Kirk: ceciliak@uoregon.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley
    Associate Editor: Rebecca McCauley×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Review
Review   |   October 01, 2014
A Psychometric Review of Norm-Referenced Tests Used to Assess Phonological Error Patterns
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2014, Vol. 45, 365-377. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-13-0053
History: Received July 29, 2013 , Revised March 17, 2014 , Accepted July 29, 2014
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2014, Vol. 45, 365-377. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-13-0053
History: Received July 29, 2013; Revised March 17, 2014; Accepted July 29, 2014

Purpose The authors provide a review of the psychometric properties of 6 norm-referenced tests designed to measure children's phonological error patterns. Three aspects of the tests' psychometric adequacy were evaluated: the normative sample, reliability, and validity.

Method The specific criteria used for determining the psychometric adequacy of these tests were based on current recommendations in the literature. Test manuals and response forms were reviewed for psychometric adequacy according to these criteria.

Results The tests included in this review failed to exhibit many of the psychometric properties required of well-designed norm-referenced tests. Of particular concern was lack of adequate sample size, poor evidence of construct validity, and lack of information about diagnostic accuracy.

Conclusions To ensure that clinicians have access to valid and reliable tests, test developers must make a greater effort to establish that the tests they design have adequate psychometric properties. The authors hope that this review will help clinicians and other professionals to be more aware of some of the limitations of using these tests to make educational decisions.

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