One Size Does Not Fit All: Improving Clinical Practice in Older Children and Adolescents With Language and Learning Disorders Purpose In the lead article for this clinical forum, Kamhi (2014)  suggests ways that current knowledge on instructional practices in learning and language can be applied to clinical practice in language disorders. I propose that Kamhi's suggestions are in need of fine-tuning for older children and adolescents with language disorders. ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 2014
One Size Does Not Fit All: Improving Clinical Practice in Older Children and Adolescents With Language and Learning Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cheryl M. Scott
    Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Cheryl M. Scott: cheryl_m_scott@rush.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: LaVae Hoffman
    Associate Editor: LaVae Hoffman×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 2014
One Size Does Not Fit All: Improving Clinical Practice in Older Children and Adolescents With Language and Learning Disorders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2014, Vol. 45, 145-152. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-14-0014
History: Received January 27, 2014 , Revised February 27, 2014 , Accepted March 4, 2014
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2014, Vol. 45, 145-152. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-14-0014
History: Received January 27, 2014; Revised February 27, 2014; Accepted March 4, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose In the lead article for this clinical forum, Kamhi (2014)  suggests ways that current knowledge on instructional practices in learning and language can be applied to clinical practice in language disorders. I propose that Kamhi's suggestions are in need of fine-tuning for older children and adolescents with language disorders. A one-size-fits-all approach to language intervention across a broad age range is untenable due to unique needs and capabilities of this older population.

Method Three intervention goal priorities for older students are presented with supporting research: complex (multiclausal) sentences, verb structure, and expository text. Methodologies for teaching complex sentences are discussed next, including topics of content/form balance and treatment intensity. These goals and methods are designed to assist students with language disorders in the comprehension and production of complex language they encounter in school.

Conclusion Guidance for high-priority language intervention goals with older students comes from a consideration of language needs in academic settings and language weaknesses that persist in this population. Although current research offers support for these goals, less is known about methodological variables such as treatment intensity.

Acknowledgments
The BCL project described in this article was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders (NIDCD) Grant # 1R15011165-01. The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIDCD or the National Institutes of Health.
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