Clinical Scientists Improving Clinical Practices: In Thoughts and Actions Purpose In this article, the author comments on aspects of Kamhi's (2014)  article, which caused the author to think more deeply about definitions of language, theories of learning, and how these two core components of intervention prepare clinical scientists as they search the literature for new knowledge. Interprofessional collaborative practice ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 2014
Clinical Scientists Improving Clinical Practices: In Thoughts and Actions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenn Apel
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Kenn Apel: kennapel@sc.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: LaVae Hoffman
    Associate Editor: LaVae Hoffman×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 2014
Clinical Scientists Improving Clinical Practices: In Thoughts and Actions
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2014, Vol. 45, 104-109. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-14-0003
History: Received January 7, 2014 , Revised February 22, 2014 , Accepted March 4, 2014
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2014, Vol. 45, 104-109. doi:10.1044/2014_LSHSS-14-0003
History: Received January 7, 2014; Revised February 22, 2014; Accepted March 4, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose In this article, the author comments on aspects of Kamhi's (2014)  article, which caused the author to think more deeply about definitions of language, theories of learning, and how these two core components of intervention prepare clinical scientists as they search the literature for new knowledge. Interprofessional collaborative practice as a model for team-based intervention in school settings is also discussed.

Method The article addresses aspects of Kamhi's article that aligned or did not align with the author's definition of language and theory of learning and explains why considering these alignments is important for clinical scientists. Two challenges to staying current with the research base are also described, and suggestions are offered for addressing these challenges. Finally, the article provides an overview of interprofessional collaborative practice.

Conclusion Clinical scientists should continue to strive to use their knowledge of what language is and how it is learned, combined with the best available scientific information, to best serve their clients. Combining their thoughts and actions, they undoubtedly will continuously improve their clinical practices.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access