Bullying: What Speech-Language Pathologists Should Know Purpose The purpose of this tutorial is to introduce speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to the broad issues surrounding the problem of school bullying in childhood and adolescence. Specifically, types of bullying and their causes are considered, as are the roles students take when bullying occurs and the effects of bullying on ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   January 01, 2014
Bullying: What Speech-Language Pathologists Should Know
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie Hughes
    University of Toledo, OH
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Stephanie Hughes: stephanie.hughes@utoledo.edu
  • Editor: C. Melanie Schuele
    Editor: C. Melanie Schuele×
  • Associate Editor: Ellen Kelly
    Associate Editor: Ellen Kelly×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   January 01, 2014
Bullying: What Speech-Language Pathologists Should Know
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2014, Vol. 45, 3-13. doi:10.1044/2013_LSHSS-13-0013
History: Received February 1, 2013 , Revised May 15, 2013 , Accepted December 20, 2013
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2014, Vol. 45, 3-13. doi:10.1044/2013_LSHSS-13-0013
History: Received February 1, 2013; Revised May 15, 2013; Accepted December 20, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose The purpose of this tutorial is to introduce speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to the broad issues surrounding the problem of school bullying in childhood and adolescence. Specifically, types of bullying and their causes are considered, as are the roles students take when bullying occurs and the effects of bullying on students with communication disorders. Strategies and suggestions to help SLPs more effectively prevent and manage bullying of students with communication disorders are discussed.

Method A review of the scholarly literature in education, psychology, child and adolescent development, and speech-language pathology was conducted. Recommendations for how SLPs can prevent and intervene in bullying incidences were extrapolated from the reviewed literature.

Results Students with communication disorders are at particularly high risk for being bullied by peers. Some students with communication disorders are “provocative victims” in that they demonstrate impairments in social skills that draw the attention of bullies. Both provocative victims and typical students may react aggressively when bullied and bully others in retaliation.

Conclusion SLPs can and should help to create an inclusive environment for all students while addressing bullying of students with communication disorders via therapeutic activities.

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