Communication Modality Sampling for a Toddler With Angelman Syndrome Purpose Vocal, gestural, and graphic communication modes were implemented concurrently with a toddler with Angelman syndrome to identify the most efficiently learned communication mode to emphasize in an initial augmentative communication system. Method Symbols representing preferred objects were introduced in vocal, gestural, and graphic communication modes using an ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   October 01, 2013
Communication Modality Sampling for a Toddler With Angelman Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jolene Hyppa Martin
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Joe Reichle
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Adele Dimian
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Mo Chen
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Correspondence to Jolene Hyppa Martin: jhyppama@umn.edu
  • Editor: C. Melanie Schuele
    Editor: C. Melanie Schuele×
  • Associate Editor: Cathy Binger
    Associate Editor: Cathy Binger×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Clinical Focus: Communication Modality Sampling for a Toddler With Angelman Syndrome
Clinical Focus   |   October 01, 2013
Communication Modality Sampling for a Toddler With Angelman Syndrome
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2013, Vol. 44, 327-336. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/12-0108)
History: Received December 18, 2012 , Revised May 17, 2013 , Accepted September 12, 2013
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2013, Vol. 44, 327-336. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/12-0108)
History: Received December 18, 2012; Revised May 17, 2013; Accepted September 12, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose Vocal, gestural, and graphic communication modes were implemented concurrently with a toddler with Angelman syndrome to identify the most efficiently learned communication mode to emphasize in an initial augmentative communication system.

Method Symbols representing preferred objects were introduced in vocal, gestural, and graphic communication modes using an alternating treatment single-subject experimental design. Conventionally accepted prompting strategies were used to teach symbols in each communication mode. Because the learner did not vocally imitate, vocal mode intervention focused on increasing vocal frequency as an initial step.

Results When graphic and gestural mode performances were compared, the learner most accurately produced requests in graphic mode (percentage of nonoverlapping data = 96). Given the lack of success in prompting vocal productions, a comparison between vocal and the other two communication modes was not made.

Conclusion A growing body of evidence suggests that concurrent modality sampling is a promising low-inference, data-driven procedure that can be used to inform selection of a communication mode(s) for initial emphasis with young children. Concurrent modality sampling can guide clinical decisions regarding the allocation of treatment resources to promote success in building an initial communicative repertoire.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported in part by Minnesota LEND-HRSA Grant #T73MC12835. The authors acknowledge the contributions of Amy Marquez. Her passion to promote research regarding intervention for children with AS and her desire to highlight the abilities, rather than the deficits, of persons with AS was an impetus for this study. Without her assistance, this study would not have been possible.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access