Adequacy and Accessibility As I write this column, the new school year has begun. Summer always seems to provide ample opportunities to forget the challenges of the school year. But when the school year starts, the challenges are right there, waiting to welcome us. In 1984 with my graduate speech-language pathology training ... Editorial
Editorial  |   October 01, 2013
Adequacy and Accessibility
 
Author Notes
  • C. Melanie SchueleEditor
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Editorial
Editorial   |   October 01, 2013
Adequacy and Accessibility
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2013, Vol. 44, 325-326. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/ed-04)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, October 2013, Vol. 44, 325-326. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/ed-04)
As I write this column, the new school year has begun. Summer always seems to provide ample opportunities to forget the challenges of the school year. But when the school year starts, the challenges are right there, waiting to welcome us. In 1984 with my graduate speech-language pathology training in my back pocket, I took my first job as a speech-language pathologist (SLP) in a rural school district in Texas. I worked alongside another new graduate. We were the only SLPs in our small district. I stayed in that job for 4 years, spending a lot of time thinking about how I could be something more than an “adequate” school SLP. In the past 5 years, I have spent a lot of time thinking about how I can prepare students to be something more than adequate school SLPs. Currently, I think a lot about how Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools (LSHSS) can help school SLPs and audiologists be more than adequate.
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