Research Article  |   July 2013
Treating Children Ages 3–6 Who Have Speech Sound Disorder: A Survey
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Klaire Mann Brumbaugh
    Kansas State University, Manhattan
  • Ann Bosma Smit
    Kansas State University, Manhattan
  • Correspondence to Ann Bosma Smit: asmit@ksu.edu
  • Klaire Mann Brumbaugh is now at Klaras Children's Center—Early Childhood Intervention, Waco, TX.
    Klaire Mann Brumbaugh is now at Klaras Children's Center—Early Childhood Intervention, Waco, TX.×
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Sally Marinellie
    Associate Editor: Sally Marinellie×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Psychogenic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 2013
Treating Children Ages 3–6 Who Have Speech Sound Disorder: A Survey
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2013, Vol. 44, 306-319. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/12-0029)
History: Received April 2, 2012 , Revised August 13, 2012 , Accepted March 14, 2013
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2013, Vol. 44, 306-319. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/12-0029)
History: Received April 2, 2012; Revised August 13, 2012; Accepted March 14, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose: In a national survey, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) were asked about service delivery and interventions they use with children ages 3–6 who have speech sound disorder (SSD).

Method: The survey was e-mailed to 2,084 SLPs who worked in pre-elementary settings across the United States. Of these, 24% completed part or all of the survey, with 18% completing the entire survey.

Results: SLPs reported that they provided children ages 3–6 who had SSD with 30 or 60 min of treatment time weekly, regardless of group or individual setting. More SLPs indicated that they used traditional intervention than other types of intervention. However, many SLPs also reported using aspects of phonological interventions and providing phonological awareness training. Fewer SLPs indicated that they used nonspeech oral motor exercises than in a previous survey (Lof & Watson, 2008). Recently graduated SLPs were no more familiar with recent advances in phonological intervention than were their more experienced colleagues.

Discussion: This study confirms previous findings (Mullen & Schooling, 2010) about the amount of service provided to children ages 3–6 who have SSD. Issues related to the use of traditional and phonological intervention with children who have phonological disorder are discussed, along with concerns related to evidence-based practice and research needs.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by a grant from the College of Human Ecology, Kansas State University, to the second author. We are grateful to Barbara Hodson for the impetus to undertake this study, to Gregg Lof and Maggie Watson for their assistance with the concept and design, to Debra Burnett for her assistance with Axio, and to Keira Mann for her editorial assistance. Any errors of design, fact, or interpretation reside with the authors alone. Finally, we want to thank the many SLPs who took time from their busy schedules to respond to this questionnaire. Portions of these data were presented in a poster at the 2011 ASHA Convention in San Diego, CA.
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