Research Article  |   July 2013
Preschool Teachers' Perception and Use of Hearing Assistive Technology in Educational Settings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauri H. Nelson
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Bridget Poole
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Karen Muñoz
    Utah State University, Logan
  • Correspondence to Lauri H. Nelson: lauri.nelson@usu.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Sheila Pratt
    Associate Editor: Sheila Pratt×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / School-Based Settings / Research Article
Research Article   |   July 2013
Preschool Teachers' Perception and Use of Hearing Assistive Technology in Educational Settings
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2013, Vol. 44, 239-251. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/12-0038)
History: Received May 10, 2012 , Revised October 16, 2012 , Accepted January 8, 2013
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2013, Vol. 44, 239-251. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2013/12-0038)
History: Received May 10, 2012; Revised October 16, 2012; Accepted January 8, 2013

Purpose: This study explored how often sound-field amplification and personal frequency-modulated (FM) systems are used in preschool classrooms, teacher perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of using hearing assistive technology, and teacher recommendations for hearing assistive technology use.

Method: The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Participants were professionals who provided services to preschool-age children who are deaf or hard of hearing in public or private schools. A total of 306 surveys were sent to 162 deaf education programs throughout the United States; 99 surveys were returned (32%). Simple statistics were used to describe the quantitative survey results; content analysis was completed on open-ended survey comments.

Results: Surveys were received from teachers working at listening and spoken language preschool programs (65%) and at bilingual–bicultural and total communication preschool programs (35%). Most respondents perceived that hearing assistive technology improved students' academic performance, speech and language development, behavior, and attention in the classroom. The majority of respondents also reported that they definitely would or probably would recommend a sound-field system (77%) or personal FM system (71%) to other educators.

Conclusion: Hearing assistive technology is frequently used in preschool classrooms of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, with generally positive teacher perceptions of the benefits of using such technology.

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