Modifying Attitudes of Arab School Teachers Toward Stuttering Purpose The authors of this quasi-experimental design study explored the effect of an educational documentary video that presented factual and emotional aspects of stuttering on changing attitudes toward stuttering of preservice trainees and in-service public school teachers in Kuwait. Method Participants were 99 preservice trainees (48 control, 51 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2014
Modifying Attitudes of Arab School Teachers Toward Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Fauzia Abdalla
    Kuwait University, Kuwait
  • Kenneth O. St. Louis
    West Virginia University, Morgantown
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Fauzia Abdalla: f.abdalla@ku.edu.kw
  • Editor: C. Melanie Schuele
    Editor: C. Melanie Schuele×
  • Associate Editor: Ellen Kelly
    Associate Editor: Ellen Kelly×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2014
Modifying Attitudes of Arab School Teachers Toward Stuttering
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2014, Vol. 45, 14-25. doi:10.1044/2013_LSHSS-13-0012
History: Received January 31, 2013 , Revised June 9, 2013 , Accepted December 4, 2013
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2014, Vol. 45, 14-25. doi:10.1044/2013_LSHSS-13-0012
History: Received January 31, 2013; Revised June 9, 2013; Accepted December 4, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

Purpose The authors of this quasi-experimental design study explored the effect of an educational documentary video that presented factual and emotional aspects of stuttering on changing attitudes toward stuttering of preservice trainees and in-service public school teachers in Kuwait.

Method Participants were 99 preservice trainees (48 control, 51 experimental) and 103 in-service teachers (49 control, 54 experimental). All participants completed 22 items from the Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes—Stuttering (POSHA–S; St. Louis, 2005; translated into Arabic) and 17 additional items pre and post treatment. Participants in the experimental group viewed the awareness video.

Results Pretreatment comparisons confirmed that the control and experimental groups did not differ on their attitudes toward stuttering. As predicted, the posttreatment ratings for the control group were not different from the pretreatment ratings. A significant shift in attitudes (mostly in a positive direction) from pre to post treatment was observed for the experimental group of preservice trainees but not for the experimental group of in-service teachers. Interpretation of the difference in outcomes for the experimental preservice group as compared to the experimental in-service group is confounded by gender differences across groups.

Conclusion The authors of this study demonstrated that it is possible to positively modify preservice trainees' attitudes of people who stutter by using an educational documentary video.

Acknowledgments
A special gratitude goes to the College of Basic Education, Kuwait Ministry of Education, principals of government schools, and teachers for their contributions. We express our appreciation to the Kuwaiti middle school teacher and two youths who stutter who were featured in the video. We wish to acknowledge the assistance of students from the Kuwait University's Department of Communication Disorders, especially Latifa Al-Salmi, for distributing and gathering the questionnaires. We thank Latifa Al-Salmi, Marwa Al-Rahmani, and Fatima Dikrallah for help in producing the video documentary; Fatima Hassan for data rendering; and Bharathi Prabhu for proofreading the article.
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