Article  |   January 2012
Overlap in Speech-Language and Reading Services for Kindergartners and First Graders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carolyn S. Gosse
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • LaVae M. Hoffman
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Marcia A. Invernizzi
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Correspondence to Carolyn S. Gosse: cls3p@virginia.edu
  • Editor: Marilyn Nippold
    Editor: Marilyn Nippold×
  • Associate Editor: Ilsa Schwarz
    Associate Editor: Ilsa Schwarz×
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Article   |   January 2012
Overlap in Speech-Language and Reading Services for Kindergartners and First Graders
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools January 2012, Vol.43, 66-80. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0056)
History: Accepted 07 Jan 2011 , Received 24 Nov 2009 , Revised 16 Jul 2010
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools January 2012, Vol.43, 66-80. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0056)
History: Accepted 07 Jan 2011 , Received 24 Nov 2009 , Revised 16 Jul 2010

Purpose: Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and reading professionals provide educational services to children who are at risk for reading difficulties, although these professions do not necessarily coordinate efforts. To date, there is limited evidence regarding the proportion of children who receive services from both professionals. The current study reports the prevalence and overlap of speech-language and reading services provided to kindergartners and first graders in Virginia.

Method: This study analyzed a population-level database of reading screening scores from 74,730 kindergartners and 75,088 first graders. Information regarding the speech-language services received by these children was obtained. Prevalence rates of speech-language impairment, reading risk, and comorbidity were calculated. The distribution of children receiving speech-language services across categories of reading competence was examined.

Results: Findings indicated that ∼6% of the children received speech-language services and 11.1% of the kindergartners and 13.7% of the first graders received reading services. One-quarter of the children receiving speech-language services also received reading services. Furthermore, children receiving speech-language services received reading services at twice the rate of children who were not receiving speech-language services in both kindergarten (23.1% vs. 9.1%) and first grade (25.2% vs. 11.3%).

Clinical Implications: This study provides empirical support for improving coordination between SLPs and reading professionals.

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