Participation as a Basis for Developing Early Intervention Outcomes Purpose This article describes how participation in activities/routines can be used as a basis for understanding children’s communication and language skills and how that knowledge can be extended to collaborate with families and caregivers to develop meaningful early intervention outcomes. Method The approach is centered on children’s use ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   July 01, 2011
Participation as a Basis for Developing Early Intervention Outcomes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Jeanne Wilcox
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Juliann Woods
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Correspondence to M. Jeanne Wilcox: mjwilcox@asu.edu
  • Editor: Laura Justice
    Editor: Laura Justice×
  • Associate Editor: Donna Boudreau
    Associate Editor: Donna Boudreau×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum: First Years, First Words—SLPs Providing Early Intervention Services
Clinical Forum   |   July 01, 2011
Participation as a Basis for Developing Early Intervention Outcomes
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2011, Vol. 42, 365-378. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0014)
History: Received March 8, 2010 , Revised August 31, 2010 , Accepted February 7, 2011
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, July 2011, Vol. 42, 365-378. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2011/10-0014)
History: Received March 8, 2010; Revised August 31, 2010; Accepted February 7, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 20

Purpose This article describes how participation in activities/routines can be used as a basis for understanding children’s communication and language skills and how that knowledge can be extended to collaborate with families and caregivers to develop meaningful early intervention outcomes.

Method The approach is centered on children’s use of communication and language skills to participate in typical activities/routines. Implementation of the approach is based on an understanding of children’s performance abilities/disabilities and their use of those abilities to participate in family-identified activities/routines in their natural environments. Discussion and case examples illustrate how communication and language skills can enhance or enable participation in such activities. Family-centered procedures for gathering information about activities/routines from caregivers are described, and strategies for developing outcomes in collaboration with caregivers are presented.

Implications Participation-based outcomes offer speech-language pathologists an option for embedding skills within important activities/routines, thereby promoting children’s communication and language growth in natural contexts.

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