Solving the Reading Crisis—Take 2: The Case for Differentiated Assessment Purpose The responses to my initial article (A. G. Kamhi, 2007) have raised serious questions about whether embracing the narrow view of reading is the best way to reduce the persistently high levels of reading failure experienced in today’s schools. This afterword provides another attempt to offer a solution to ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 2009
Solving the Reading Crisis—Take 2: The Case for Differentiated Assessment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    University of North Carolina–Greensboro
  • Contact author: Alan G. Kamhi, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 300 Ferguson Building, University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27402. E-mail: agkamhi@uncg.edu.
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / ASHA News & Member Stories / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 2009
Solving the Reading Crisis—Take 2: The Case for Differentiated Assessment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2009, Vol. 40, 212-215. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0069)
History: Received June 18, 2008 , Accepted August 18, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2009, Vol. 40, 212-215. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0069)
History: Received June 18, 2008; Accepted August 18, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The responses to my initial article (A. G. Kamhi, 2007) have raised serious questions about whether embracing the narrow view of reading is the best way to reduce the persistently high levels of reading failure experienced in today’s schools. This afterword provides another attempt to offer a solution to this problem without the distraction of the narrow view of reading.

Method This second attempt to solve the reading crisis draws on the five responses in this clinical forum and other helpful comments from colleagues who responded to the initial article in The ASHA Leader.

Conclusion The way to eliminate high levels of reading failure is to differentiate word recognition from domain-general reading comprehension and specific subject knowledge in high-stakes assessments. This differentiation will focus attention on the true crisis in American education—knowledge deficiencies in the sciences, history, math, literature, and other subject areas that are important for success in the 21st century.

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