Making a Broader Case for the Narrow View: Where to Begin? Purpose This final article covering the topic of the interplay between decoding, comprehension, and content versus structure knowledge describes a set of language initiatives that are focused toward content area learning. Inspired by the work of their colleagues from diverse fields and their own work, the authors offer suggestions to ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   April 01, 2009
Making a Broader Case for the Narrow View: Where to Begin?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Geraldine P. Wallach
    California State University at Long Beach
  • Stephen Charlton
    Huntington Beach Union High School District, CA
  • Julie Christie
    Los Angeles Unified School Board, CA
  • Contact author: Geraldine P. Wallach, California State University at Long Beach, Department of Communicative Disorders, 1250 Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach, CA 90840. E-mail: coronacape@aol.com.
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum   |   April 01, 2009
Making a Broader Case for the Narrow View: Where to Begin?
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2009, Vol. 40, 201-211. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0043)
History: Received April 19, 2008 , Accepted August 18, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, April 2009, Vol. 40, 201-211. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/08-0043)
History: Received April 19, 2008; Accepted August 18, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

Purpose This final article covering the topic of the interplay between decoding, comprehension, and content versus structure knowledge describes a set of language initiatives that are focused toward content area learning. Inspired by the work of their colleagues from diverse fields and their own work, the authors offer suggestions to clinicians who are interested in creating and delivering curriculum-relevant and strategic-based language intervention to school-age students with language learning disabilities (LLD).

Method The discussion covers selected topics that form the foundation for an evolving intervention framework, including (a) understanding the content and structural requirements of textbooks, (b) integrating metacognitive and metalinguistic techniques into intervention goals and objectives, and (c) emphasizing meaning-based activities that cut across connected discourse (macrostructure levels) and sentence/word components (microstructure levels) of spoken and written language.

Conclusion Starting with ways to find clues about “what to do” with students by looking in their textbooks, the authors continue with examples that integrate content and structure knowledge using social studies and science as backdrops for language intervention. The article ends with a reminder to clinicians to consider ways that preschool language intervention can be more effective in helping children prepare for the academic demands of the future.

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