Accelerating Preschoolers' Early Literacy Development Through Classroom-Based Teacher–Child Storybook Reading and Explicit Print Referencing Purpose This study examined the impact of teacher use of a print referencing style during classroom-based storybook reading sessions conducted over an academic year. Impacts on preschoolers' early literacy development were examined, focusing specifically on the domain of print knowledge. Method This randomized, controlled trial examined the effects ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 2009
Accelerating Preschoolers' Early Literacy Development Through Classroom-Based Teacher–Child Storybook Reading and Explicit Print Referencing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura M. Justice
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Joan N. Kaderavek
    University of Toledo, OH
  • Xitao Fan
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Amy Sofka
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Aileen Hunt
    University of Toledo
  • Contact author: Laura Justice, College of Education and Human Ecology, The Ohio State University, 231 Arps Hall, 1945 N. High St., Columbus, OH 43210. E-mail: justice.57@osu.edu.
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 2009
Accelerating Preschoolers' Early Literacy Development Through Classroom-Based Teacher–Child Storybook Reading and Explicit Print Referencing
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2009, Vol. 40, 67-85. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/07-0098)
History: Received December 18, 2007 , Revised February 12, 2008 , Accepted March 18, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2009, Vol. 40, 67-85. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/07-0098)
History: Received December 18, 2007; Revised February 12, 2008; Accepted March 18, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 81

Purpose This study examined the impact of teacher use of a print referencing style during classroom-based storybook reading sessions conducted over an academic year. Impacts on preschoolers' early literacy development were examined, focusing specifically on the domain of print knowledge.

Method This randomized, controlled trial examined the effects of a print referencing style on 106 preschool children attending 23 classrooms serving disadvantaged preschoolers. Following random assignment, teachers in 14 classrooms used a print referencing style during 120 large-group storybook reading sessions during a 30-week period. Teachers in 9 comparison classrooms read at the same frequency and with the same storybooks but used their normal style of reading.

Results Children whose teachers used a print referencing style showed larger gains on 3 standardized measures of print knowledge: print concept knowledge, alphabet knowledge, and name writing, with medium-sized effects.

Clinical Implications The convergence of the present findings with those of previous efficacy studies indicates that print referencing intervention can be used confidently as an approach for facilitating print knowledge in preschool-age children. Speech-language pathologists can serve an important role in supporting preschool educators as they use this evidence-based technique with pupils in their classrooms.

Acknowledgments
We thank the many administrators, teachers, and students who contributed to this project. We are grateful to the many research assistants who helped to collect and code data, with special mention for Elizabeth Cottone, Tricia Zucker, and Anita McGinty, among others. Funding was provided by the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, Grant R305G050057. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Institute of Education Sciences, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Education.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access