Article  |   January 2009
The Effects of Context on the Classroom Discourse Skills of Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathleen F. Peets
    York University, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Kathleen F. Peets, York University, BSB, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M3J 1P3. E-mail: kpeets@post.harvard.edu.
  • © 2009 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders
Article   |   January 2009
The Effects of Context on the Classroom Discourse Skills of Children With Language Impairment
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2009, Vol. 40, 5-16. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/07-0012)
History: Received March 1, 2007 , Revised July 12, 2007 , Accepted March 5, 2008
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2009, Vol. 40, 5-16. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2008/07-0012)
History: Received March 1, 2007; Revised July 12, 2007; Accepted March 5, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of context on the classroom discourse skills of children with language impairment (LI).

Method: Four classroom contexts were audiotaped among 11 children with LI: a journal-writing conference, a small-group lesson, a peer play session, and sharing time.

Results: Context affected the children’s performances on language productivity and complexity measures, self-monitoring strategies, and turn-taking patterns.

Clinical Implications: Classroom discourse as a set of discourse genres is critical in the assessment and intervention of LI. In order to be representative of a given child’s competence, several of such genres must be sampled in language assessment.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a doctoral fellowship to the author from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and by an Advanced Doctoral Student Grant from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.
Thank you to Gina Biancarosa who acted as the reliability coder for turn taking, and to the doctoral supervising committee who contributed richly to this research: Catherine Snow, Barbara Alexander Pan, and Lowry Hemphill. Thank you also to the teachers and children who participated in the study.
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