Can Clinicians Be Scientists? I asked my first year graduate students this question in my class yesterday. Now, in the interest of full disclosure, the students knew my view on this question. They had just read several articles about this question and a related one for the class session (Apel, 1999; Hewitt, 2000; ... Editorial
Editorial  |   January 01, 2009
Can Clinicians Be Scientists?
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   January 01, 2009
Can Clinicians Be Scientists?
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2009, Vol. 40, 3-4. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/ed-01)
 
Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, January 2009, Vol. 40, 3-4. doi:10.1044/0161-1461(2009/ed-01)
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1
I asked my first year graduate students this question in my class yesterday. Now, in the interest of full disclosure, the students knew my view on this question. They had just read several articles about this question and a related one for the class session (Apel, 1999; Hewitt, 2000; Kamhi, 1999, 2000). Having read those articles, they undoubtedly were aware that my answer was yes; some of us in this profession are clinical scientists, some are research scientists, and some are both. However, having disclosed that information, I was quite certain that this particular group of students, who are encouragingly inquisitive and interested in learning, would have their own specific opinions, if not differing views. Interestingly, the resounding response to my question was yes, clinicians can, and indeed are, scientists. The consistency of their answers actually surprised me and, I believe, showed a high level of insight given their relative recent entry in the profession. Following are paraphrases of some of their responses:
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